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  • WEBINAR - COVID-19 & Lactation: Translating Knowledge in a Pandemic

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The COVID-19 pandemic has presented an enormous challenge for the entire world, and unique challenges for lactation professionals as they face challenges supporting breastfeeding and the use of human milk in the face of rapidly evolving scientific knowledge, severe public health and governmental measures to attempt to control the epidemic, and additional threats to health systems that struggle to limit infection and supply protections to health care workers. This presentation brings together knowledge from public health and the social sciences to help address some of the most pressing concerns lactation professionals face right now in the field.

    COVID-19 & Lactation: Translating Knowledge in a Pandemic

    The COVID-19 pandemic has presented an enormous challenge for the entire world, and unique challenges for lactation professionals as they face challenges supporting breastfeeding and the use of human milk in the face of rapidly evolving scientific knowledge, severe public health and governmental measures to attempt to control the epidemic, and additional threats to health systems that struggle to limit infection and supply protections to health care workers. This presentation brings together knowledge from public health and the social sciences to help address some of the most pressing concerns lactation professionals face right now in the field.

    Credit: 1.50 L CERP and 1.50 Contact Hours

    Source: ILCA Webinar 15 April 2020

    Presented by: Cecilia Tomori, PhD, MA 

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    1.  Describe key public health evidence about COVID-19
    2.  Describe core tenets of WHO guidance on COVID-19 in relation to lactation
    3. Identify underlying cultural assumptions that are reflected in diversity of COVID-19 guidance in different settings
    4. Locate relevant emerging evidence and guidance for COVID-19 in relation to lactation
    5. Translate this knowledge into action in supporting lactating families in their practice

    Learning Level: Intermediate, Advanced

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    ILCA webinars are provided as a service to our members for continuing education, knowledge, and awareness. We believe in fostering an inclusive environment that supports diversity and removes barriers. The views and opinions expressed in this webinar, including the choice of vocabulary and expressions, belong to the webinar presenter.  ILCA is steadfast in our commitment to present, learn, and discuss any information in a safe, respectful, and supportive environment - we believe that we are better together.

    Cecilia Tomori, PhD, MA

    Director of Global Public Health and Community Health, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing

    Cecília Tomori, PhD, MA is a Hungarian-American anthropologist and public health scholar who currently serves as Director of Global Public Health and Community Health at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. Dr. Tomori’s research combines anthropological and public health approaches to investigate and address the structural and sociocultural drivers that shape health inequities in maternal and child health as well as sexual and reproductive health. This work centers on deep engagement with the lived experiences of local and global communities who face numerous health challenges due to stigmatization and discrimination. Dr. Tomori has a demonstrated track record of successful collaborations with colleagues at Johns Hopkins and beyond on breastfeeding, infant sleep, and HIV prevention. She has authored two books that explore social and biocultural aspects of breastfeeding, Breastfeeding: New Anthropological Approaches (with AEL Palmquist & EA Quinn, Routledge 2018) and Nighttime Breastfeeding: An American Cultural Dilemma (Berghahn 2014),  and numerous publications on a range of public health issues in journals including Social Science and MedicineAIDS and BehaviorArchives of Sexual Behavior, and BMC Public Health.

  • WEBINAR - Baby Led Weaning and the Role of the IBCLC

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Baby Led Weaning as an approach to introducing solids has been growing in popularity over the past 15 years. However, despite the growing demand from parents, there remains a lack of guidance from health care professionals. Additionally, there are some misconceptions around baby led weaning including safety. This presentation looks to provide further understanding of what baby led weaning is and how the lactation professional can provide guidance to parents.

    Baby Led Weaning and the Role of the IBCLC

    Baby Led Weaning as an approach to introducing solids has been growing in popularity over the past 15 years. However, despite the growing demand from parents, there remains a lack of guidance from health care professionals. Additionally, there are some misconceptions around baby led weaning including safety. This presentation looks to provide further understanding of what baby led weaning is and how the lactation professional can provide guidance to parent

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Webinar 1 April 2020

    Presented by: Meghan McMillan, RD, CSP, IBCLC
     

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    1. Define Baby Led Weaning

    2. Identify the reasons parents choose Baby Led Weaning approach

    3. List the safety concerns of Baby Led Weaning

    4. Describe the implementation of Baby Led Weaning


    Learning Level: Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    ILCA webinars are provided as a service to our members for continuing education, knowledge, and awareness. We believe in fostering an inclusive environment that supports diversity and removes barriers. The views and opinions expressed in this webinar, including the choice of vocabulary and expressions, belong to the webinar presenter.  ILCA is steadfast in our commitment to present, learn, and discuss any information in a safe, respectful, and supportive environment - we believe that we are better together.

    Meghan McMillan

    Meghan McMillin holds a Master’s Degree in Human Nutrition from the University of Illinois at Chicago. She is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) and Board Certified Specialist in Pediatric Nutrition (CSP). Further, Meghan obtained the credential of International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC). 

    Located in the United States, Meghan is the owner of Mama & Sweet Pea Nutrition, a private practice and consulting company that focuses on prenatal, postpartum and infant care. The introduction of solids, food allergies, and baby led weaning are among her specialties.

    Meghan is a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and presented on Baby Led Weaning at their Food & Nutrition Conference in 2018. She is also a member of the Northern Illinois Lactation Consultant Association and sits on the board for Breastfeed Chicago, a local non-profit. In addition, Meghan is a freelance writer and co-authored the eBook Avoiding Allergens While Breastfeeding.

  • WEBINAR - Breastfeeding Strategies Used by Women with Physical Disabilities

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Women with physical disabilities have a desire to breastfeed. However, women with physical disabilities also experience unique barriers that may interfere with their feeding goals. Improved support from healthcare professionals, including lactation consultants is necessary to overcome these challenges. This presentation will outline how healthcare professionals can incorporate the breastfeeding techniques identified in our study when caring for and supporting women with physical disabilities who wish to breastfeed.

    Breastfeeding Strategies Used by Women with Physical Disabilities

    Women with physical disabilities have a desire to breastfeed. However, women with physical disabilities also experience unique barriers that may interfere with their feeding goals. Improved support from healthcare professionals, including lactation consultants is necessary to overcome these challenges. This presentation will outline how healthcare professionals can incorporate the breastfeeding techniques identified in our study when caring for and supporting women with physical disabilities who wish to breastfeed.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Webinar 13 February 2020

    Presented by: Tiahna Warkentin, University of Toronto, MD Candidate 2020

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    1.  Outline effective breastfeeding/chestfeeding strategies used by lactating parents with physical disabilities.
    2.  Describe the challenges parents with physical disabilities experience when breastfeeding/chestfeeding.

    Learning Level: Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    ILCA webinars are provided as a service to our members for continuing education, knowledge, and awareness. We believe in fostering an inclusive environment that supports diversity and removes barriers. The views and opinions expressed in this webinar, including the choice of vocabulary and expressions, belong to the webinar presenter.  ILCA is steadfast in our commitment to present, learn, and discuss any information in a safe, respectful, and supportive environment - we believe that we are better together.

    Tiahna Warkentin

    MD Candidate 2020

    Tiahna is a final year medical student at the University of Toronto. She has a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology with a focus in Exercise, Disability, and Aging studies. She has spent the past four years working with Dr. Berndl at Sunnybrook Health Sciences centre exploring Breastfeeding Strategies Used by Women with Physical Disability. She is passionate about working with individuals with physical disabilities to identify and address barriers that impact function. 

  • WEBINAR - Care of the Same Sex Family

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Disparities exist in the health care system in regards to the quantity and quality of care received by LGBTQ individuals and same sex families as compared to heterosexual individuals and families. Nurses and health care providers require increased knowledge about this population and strategies to effectively communicate and care for individuals and families in this community. Many nurses and health care providers lack knowledge about the LGBTQ population and same sex families; they have not been educated in strategies to deliver culturally appropriate care.

    Care of the Same Sex Family

    Disparities exist in the health care system in regards to the quantity and quality of care received by LGBTQ individuals and same sex families as compared to heterosexual individuals and families. Nurses and health care providers require increased knowledge about this population and strategies to effectively communicate and care for individuals and families in this community. Many nurses and health care providers lack knowledge about the LGBTQ population and same sex families; they have not been educated in strategies to deliver culturally appropriate care.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Webinar 10 October 2019 

    Presented by: Diane DiTomasso, PhD, RN

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Participants will be able to describe several social and political changes that have impacted the care of same sex families.
    • Participants will be able to describe at least two unique challenges faced by same sex families.
    • Participants will be able to identify strategies that can be used in their practice to improve the quality of care for same sex individuals and families.

    Learning Level: All

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    ILCA webinars are provided as a service to our members for continuing education, knowledge, and awareness. We believe in fostering an inclusive environment that supports diversity and removes barriers. The views and opinions expressed in this webinar, including the choice of vocabulary and expressions, belong to the webinar presenter.  ILCA is steadfast in our commitment to present, learn, and discuss any information in a safe, respectful, and supportive environment… we believe that we are better together.

    Diane DiTomasso, PhD, RN

    Assistant Professor College of Nursing University of Rhode Island

    For more than 25 years, Dr. Diane DiTomasso worked as a nurse in the area of maternal child nursing. Her areas of specialty included antepartum, labor and delivery, postpartum, lactation, and newborn care. She was instrumental in establishing one of the first outpatient lactation services in Rhode Island, United States for women seeking breastfeeding support. She also worked with colleagues to earn New England’s first Baby Friendly Hospital Award at South County Hospital in Wakefield, Rhode Island. Currently, she is the coordinator of the maternal child health nursing course at the University of Rhode Island. She teaches nursing students in classroom and clinical settings. In addition, she teaches nursing research courses at the undergraduate and graduate level. Dr. DiTomasso has several peer-reviewed publications on the topics of breastfeeding and neonatal weight loss.

  • WEBINAR - Overcoming Adversity: A Pediatrician Perspective on Supplemental Nursing System (SNS)

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Understanding lactation physiology, allows the lactation consultant to better assess and support a family’s expectation to adequately breastfeed or feed at the chest, while developing or reestablishing supply; in order to sustain healthy growth and development of a child. Through home made nursing supplemental systems (SNS), we have been able to surpass breastfeeding difficulties; such as refusal to go to the breast, abscessed mastitis and poor weight gain derived from it, development of an adoptive lactation; therefore allowing us to accompany breastfeeding families, with safe and effective pro-lactation oriented solutions, to progressively establish or re-establish supply, while stimulating mothers physiology or treating her pathology and preserving, baby’s suction biomechanics; all at the same time. Generally pediatricians (which are a crucial factor in deciding, what type of nutrition will baby receive), don't know or are not proficient enough; at managing, supplemental nursing systems, and due to that; they don’t consider it as a feasible approach. Unfailingly, this can have a major impact, in growth and development, as well as in the quality of the nutritional offer. Human Lactation has been proven to be the nutritional, neurobiological and immunological gold standard for babies, exclusively during the first six months of life and accompanied by solid foods, beyond two years of age. Because of this, pediatricians should be able to incorporate this simple but effective device, in to their therapeutic approaches, for families seeking to sustain a full or partial initiation or restoration of their breastfeeding capabilities. The SNS stands as a great pro-Lactation solution, to overcome breastfeeding difficulties, which can jeopardize a healthy and fulfilling Breastfeeding history.

    Overcoming Adversity: A Pediatrician Perspective on Supplemental Nursing System (SNS)

    Understanding lactation physiology, allows the lactation consultant to better assess and support a family’s expectation to adequately breastfeed or feed at the chest, while developing or reestablishing supply; in order to sustain healthy growth and development of a child. Through home made nursing supplemental systems (SNS), we have been able to surpass breastfeeding difficulties; such as refusal to go to the breast, abscessed mastitis and poor weight gain derived from it, development of an adoptive lactation; therefore allowing us to accompany breastfeeding families, with safe and effective pro-lactation oriented solutions, to progressively establish or re-establish supply, while stimulating mothers physiology or treating her pathology and preserving, baby’s suction biomechanics; all at the same time. Generally pediatricians (which are a crucial factor in deciding, what type of nutrition will baby receive), don't know or are not proficient enough; at managing, supplemental nursing systems, and due to that; they don’t consider it as a feasible approach. Unfailingly, this can have a major impact, in growth and development, as well as in the quality of the nutritional offer. Human Lactation has been proven to be the nutritional, neurobiological and immunological gold standard for babies, exclusively during the first six months of life and accompanied by solid foods, beyond two years of age. Because of this, pediatricians should be able to incorporate this simple but effective device, in to their therapeutic approaches, for families seeking to sustain a full or partial initiation or restoration of their breastfeeding capabilities. The SNS stands as a great pro-Lactation solution, to overcome breastfeeding difficulties, which can jeopardize a healthy and fulfilling Breastfeeding history.

    Credit: 1.5 L CERPs and 1.5 Contact Hours

    Source: ILCA Webinar 25 September 2019 

    Presented by: Patricia Diaz L. MD, Pediatrician, IBCLC, Doula

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Identify the factors that make imperative; developing techniques and methodologies like the SNS, to achieve feeding at the breast.
    • Identify key situations in which a SNS, could be considered as a part of the lactation strategy.
    • Learn about the advantages of the SNS, as a prolactation solution, to establish or reestablish mother’s milk supply.
    • Learn how to build a SNS, in areas where the commercial presentation is not available.

    Learning Level: Intermediate/Advanced

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Patricia Diaz

    MD, Pediatrician, IBCLC, Doula

    Founder and Advisor for the Pro-Lactation Birthing and Newborn attention Protocol at La Trinidad Teaching Medical Center.

    Chairperson at the Organizational Committee and invited Speaker for the Annual World Breastfeeding Week Conference since 2015, La Trinidad Educational Medical Center. Caracas, Venezuela.

    Founder of Pediatric Autana: Educational platform, that develops Educational products (workshops, Master Classes, webinars) for expectant parents, breastfeeding families and care takers; in all subjects related to Human Lactation, Growth and Development from the neurobiological perspective. Social
    Media presence @PediatriaAutana (twitter, Facebook, IG).

    Pediatrician for rural areas with attendance of Venezuelan indigenous population WARAO, at Delta Amacuro, Conjoint Obstetrics and Pediatric activities sponsored by “Project MOTHER”.

    Weekly national TV appearance as Pediatric and Lactation Specialist , during the Section “Ask the Experts” in Portada’s Morning Magazine - Venevisión.

    Speaker at 2017 ILCA’s Annual Conference, Toronto Canada “Love Has it Science, The Foundation of Nurturing Families” Conference.

    Speaker at 2019 ILCA’s Annual Conference, Atlanta USA. “The Birth of Lactation Culture: A Take on Becoming a Pro-Lactation Institution from La Trinidad Teaching Medical Centre” Conference.

    Member of the Venezuelan Pediatric Society, International Lactation Association, and Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine.

  • CONF 2019 The Role of Lactation Consultants in the Code

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/25/2019

    In this session, Laurence Grummer-Strawn, MPA, MA, PhD​ presents on how the promotion of breast-milk substitutes, particularly through the health care system, is a significant barrier to optimal infant and young child feeding. The International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes lays out responsibilities for health workers and health systems in protecting breastfeeding. The 2016 WHA resolution 69.9 extended these responsibilities further, focusing on avoiding conflicts of interest in relationships with manufacturers and distributers of breast-milk substitutes. As health professionals focusing on breastfeeding, lactation consultants have a special role to play in advocating for the Code and educating their health care partners on their responsibilities under the Code. Lactation consultants are in a unique position to identify Code violations through their interactions with mothers and in observing health care institutions. WHO and UNICEF have developed a toolkit on Code monitoring that can assist countries in working with lactation consultants in enforcing national laws on the marketing of breast-milk substitutes.

    The Role of Lactation Consultants in the Code

    In this session, Laurence Grummer-Strawn, MPA, MA, PhD presents on how the promotion of breast-milk substitutes, particularly through the health care system, is a significant barrier to optimal infant and young child feeding.  The International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes lays out responsibilities for health workers and health systems in protecting breastfeeding. The 2016 WHA resolution 69.9 extended these responsibilities further, focusing on avoiding conflicts of interest in relationships with manufacturers and distributers of breast-milk substitutes. As health professionals focusing on breastfeeding, lactation consultants have a special role to play in advocating for the Code and educating their health care partners on their responsibilities under the Code. Lactation consultants are in a unique position to identify Code violations through their interactions with mothers and in observing health care institutions. WHO and UNICEF have developed a toolkit on Code monitoring that can assist countries in working with lactation consultants in enforcing national laws on the marketing of breast-milk substitutes.


    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2019 - Atlanta, Georgia, US

    Presented by: Laurence Grummer-Strawn, MPA, MA, PhD

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    List at least three responsibilities of health care providers in limiting the promotion of breast-milk substitutes.

    Identify tools available for educating health care providers about the Code.

    Describe potential mechanisms for monitoring implementation of the Code.

    Learning Level: Beginner/Intermediate/Advanced

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Laurence M. Grummer-Strawn

    MPA, MA, PhD

    Laurence Grummer-Strawn is the coordinator of infant and young child feeding at the World Health Organization.  Until December 2014, he served as chief of the Nutrition Branch at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  Having earned his PhD from Princeton University, he worked at CDC for over 23 years, in the areas of Reproductive Health and Nutrition.  He is an epidemiologist who has published over 150 scientific publications.  He is recognized internationally for his work on vitamin and mineral deficiencies, breastfeeding policy, and development of both the CDC and the WHO Growth Charts.  Dr. Grummer-Strawn was the scientific editor of the US Surgeon General’s Call to Action on Breastfeeding.  He created the CDC Guide to Breastfeeding Interventions, CDC’s collection of breastfeeding data in the National Immunization Survey, the State Breastfeeding Report Card, the CDC survey of Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care (mPINC).  At WHO, Dr. Grummer-Strawn leads the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative, the Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes, and the Global Breastfeeding Collective.

  • CONF 2019 Breastfeeding Without Nursing: Reducing the Prejudice Against Exclusive Pumping

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/25/2019

    In this session, Fiona Jardine, MA (Cantab.), LLM, MLS, ALC​ presents on how exclusive pumping (EPing) can—and successfully does—provide the solution to many breastfeeding problems while still providing the benefits of feeding human milk. However, research on EPing is scant and often limited to secondary analysis of existing data, content analysis of expressed milk, or pumping in the context of the neonatal intensive care unit. Despite the increasing rates of EPing, little is known about the reasons for EPing initiation and cessation, the support needs and information behaviors of exclusive pumpers (EPers), or EPers’ lived experiences. My research collected data from current and past EPers through a one-time initial survey and longitudinally through a series of follow-up surveys. While the surveys covered a wide range of topics, this workshop focuses on the reactions respondents experienced when others found out they were EPing, as well as the information and support they received from a variety of different sources. While many reported positive reactions to and support of EPing, an alarming number reported the opposite, especially from healthcare and lactation care providers. Together with poor advice, this lack of appropriate support of EPing often contributes to EPers feeling frustrated and unsupported, threatening both the initiation and duration of their breastfeeding journey. This workshop will examine the reasons EPers initiate and cease EPing in the context of these undesirable experiences and what caregivers/parents, healthcare and lactation care providers, educators, policy makers, researchers, and activists can do to improve the lived experiences of EPers.

    Breastfeeding Without Nursing: Reducing the Prejudice Against Exclusive Pumping

    In this session, Fiona Jardine, MA (Cantab.), LLM, MLS, ALC presents on how exclusive pumping (EPing) can—and successfully does—provide the solution to many breastfeeding problems while still providing the benefits of feeding human milk. However, research on EPing is scant and often limited to secondary analysis of existing data, content analysis of expressed milk, or pumping in the context of the neonatal intensive care unit. Despite the increasing rates of EPing, little is known about the reasons for EPing initiation and cessation, the support needs and information behaviors of exclusive pumpers (EPers), or EPers’ lived experiences. My research collected data from current and past EPers through a one-time initial survey and longitudinally through a series of follow-up surveys. While the surveys covered a wide range of topics, this workshop focuses on the reactions respondents experienced when others found out they were EPing, as well as the information and support they received from a variety of different sources.  While many reported positive reactions to and support of EPing, an alarming number reported the opposite, especially from healthcare and lactation care providers. Together with poor advice, this lack of appropriate support of EPing often contributes to EPers feeling frustrated and unsupported, threatening both the initiation and duration of their breastfeeding journey. This workshop will examine the reasons EPers initiate and cease EPing in the context of these undesirable experiences and what caregivers/parents, healthcare and lactation care providers, educators, policy makers, researchers, and activists can do to improve the lived experiences of EPers.


    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2019 - Atlanta, Georgia, US

    Presented by: Fiona Jardine, MA (Cantab.), LLM, MLS, ALC

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    Identify why some parents exclusively pump rather than feed directly at the breast/chest.

    Discuss the range of feelings exclusive pumpers have in relation to others’ opinions of this feeding method.

    Advocate and implement strategies for the inclusion of and support for exclusive pumping.

    Learning Level: Beginner/Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Fiona Jardine

    Fiona Jardine is a PhD candidate at the University of Maryland’s iSchool where she is conducting pioneering research into the experiences of those who exclusively pump human milk, specifically focusing on the information they need, how they find it, and what they do with it. However, she is able to provide insights into many different aspects of exclusive pumping thanks to the breadth of the data she collected. Fiona is also an Advanced Lactation Consultant and a postpartum doula so that she can provide the support that she believes is so desperately needed, especially in the fourth trimester.

  • CONF 2019 Tongue or the Breast? Teasing Out the Etiology of Breastfeeding Problems

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/25/2019

    In this session, Catherine Watson Genna, BS, IBCLC presents on how breastfeeding difficulties can be rooted in maternal and/or infant pathology or management. This presentation reviews maternal conditions and suboptimal early breastfeeding management associated with low milk production and infant structural issues that interfere with breastfeeding initiation.

    Tongue or the Breast? Teasing Out the Etiology of Breastfeeding Problems

    In this session, Catherine Watson Genna, BS, IBCLC presents on how breastfeeding difficulties can be rooted in maternal and/or infant pathology or management. This presentation reviews maternal conditions and suboptimal early breastfeeding management associated with low milk production and infant structural issues that interfere with breastfeeding initiation.


    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2019 - Atlanta, Georgia, US

    Presented by: Catherine Watson Genna, BS, IBCLC

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    List four maternal issues that might negatively impact breastfeeding initiation.

    Describe three conditions that impact infant tongue mobility, strength or respiratory reserve.

    Learning Level: Beginner/Intermediate/Advanced

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Catherine Watson Genna

    BS, IBCLC

    Catherine Watson Genna BS, IBCLC is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant in private practice in New York City. Certified in 1992, Catherine is particularly interested in helping moms and babies breastfeed when they have medical challenges and is an active clinical mentor. She speaks to healthcare professionals around the world on assisting breastfeeding babies with anatomical, genetic or neurological problems. Her presentations and her writing are enriched by her clinical photographs and videos. Catherine collaborates with Columbia University and Tel Aviv University Departments of Biomedical Engineering on research projects investigating the biomechanics of the lactating nipple and various aspects of sucking and swallowing in breastfeeding infants. She is the author of Selecting and Using Breastfeeding Tools: Improving Care and Outcomes (Praeclarus Press 2009) and Supporting Sucking Skills in Breastfeeding Infants (Jones and Bartlett Learning 2008, 2013, 2017) as well as professional journal articles and chapters in the Core Curriculum for Lactation Consultant Practice and Breastfeeding and Human Lactation. Catherine served as Associate Editor of the United States Lactation Consultant Association’s official journal Clinical Lactation for its first seven years. She is still a La Leche League Leader.

  • CONF 2019 Integrating Lactation Support into Early Intervention Services for Infants with Special Needs

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/25/2019

    In this session, Jada Wright Nichols, MS, OTR/L, IBCLC presents on early childhood intervention as a support and educational system for very young children (aged birth to three in America, or to six, in some other countries) who have been victims of, or who are at high risk or have developmental delays or disabilities. Some states and regions have chosen to focus these services on children with developmental disabilities or delays, but Early Childhood Intervention is not limited to children with these disabilities. The mission of early childhood intervention is to assure that families who have at-risk children in this age range receive resources and supports that assist them in maximizing their child's physical, cognitive, and social/emotional development while respecting the diversity of families and communities. Typically, the services are state/ regionally funded, and include physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, nutrition, social work, and, psychological, and education services. These interdisciplinary services are produced in the child’s natural environment, and the service providers may be from the public or private sector. Weaving lactation evaluation and consultation services into what’s already being provided is an ideal way to help normalize breastfeeding, and increase access to breastfeeding support to some of the most vulnerable families, thereby improving breastfeeding rates and helping to decrease comorbidities and other threats to public health. Strategies for incorporating lactation support, as well as for working with other allied health professionals will be addressed.

    Integrating Lactation Support into Early Intervention Services for Infants with Special Needs

    In this session, Jada Wright Nichols, MS, OTR/L, IBCLC presents on early childhood intervention as a support and educational system for very young children (aged birth to three in America, or to six, in some other countries) who have been victims of, or who are at high risk or have developmental delays or disabilities. Some states and regions have chosen to focus these services on children with developmental disabilities or delays, but Early Childhood Intervention is not limited to children with these disabilities.   The mission of early childhood intervention is to assure that families who have at-risk children in this age range receive resources and supports that assist them in maximizing their child's physical, cognitive, and social/emotional development while respecting the diversity of families and communities. Typically, the services are state/ regionally funded, and include physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, nutrition, social work, and, psychological, and education services.   These interdisciplinary services are produced in the child’s natural environment, and the service providers may be from the public or private sector.   Weaving lactation evaluation and consultation services into what’s already being provided is an ideal way to help normalize breastfeeding, and increase access to breastfeeding support to some of the most vulnerable families, thereby improving breastfeeding rates and helping to decrease comorbidities and other threats to public health.   Strategies for incorporating lactation support, as well as for working with other allied health professionals will be addressed.


    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2019 - Atlanta, Georgia, US

    Presented by: Jada Wright Nichols, MS, OTR/L, IBCLC

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    Describe strategies for infusing lactation support into early intervention practices.

    Identify local service providers with whom to collaborate for service provision.

    Learning Level: Beginner/Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Jada Wright Nichols

    Jada Wright Nichols is maternal wellness consultant, who owns a private practice, which offers rehabilitation, yoga, massage, doula, and lactation services for new and expectant families. She also works as a NICU lactation consultant in a Children’s Hospital. She is an active member of the Tennessee Breastfeeding Coalition, a founder of BSTARS (Breastfeeding Sisters That Are Receiving Support), and the Vice-President of Breastfeeding USA.

  • WEBINAR - A Novel Relactation Program Among Bottle-Feeding Inpatients in a Tertiary Public Hospital in the Philippines

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    There is paucity of guidance on relactation among health workers. This webinar describes a novel relactation program for inpatient bottle-feeding infants at the Philippine National Children’s Hospital.

    A Novel Relactation Program Among Bottle-Feeding Inpatients in a Tertiary Public Hospital in the Philippines

    There is paucity of guidance on relactation among health workers. This webinar describes a novel relactation program for inpatient bottle-feeding infants at the Philippine National Children’s Hospital.

    Credit: 1 L CERPs and 1 Contact Hours

    Source: ILCA Webinar 10 July 2019 

    Presented by: Joanne Datangel-Gallardo, MD, DPPS

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Describe the elements of the novel relactation program for bottle-feeding parent-infant dyads  in a low-resource inpatient setting in the Philippines.
    • List the steps to important relactation skills such as hand expression, drop and drip technique, and self breast massage.
    • Present the outcomes of the study.

    Learning Level: Intermediate/Advanced

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Joanne Datangel-Gallardo

    MD, DPPS

    A board certified pediatrician, Dr Datangel-Gallardo served at National Children’s Hospital for 7 years as Chief Resident and as Assistant Head for the Breastfeeding Committee.  Her research on Relactation Success among Mothers of Formula Fed Infants Who Received Breastfeeding Support has been received well in the recent 2018 International Conference on the Theory and Practice of Human Lactation Research and Management in Florida, USA.  Using the 20-hour WHO/UNICEF Lactation Management Training modules, she has trained more than a hundred health care professionals on lactation counselling and management. She counselled mothers to achieve their breastfeeding goals. She is a member of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine. She also serves as a missionary doctor, and as volunteer trainer for the Management of Severe Acute Malnutrition among health professionals. Graduated top 10 of her batch at St. Luke's College of Medicine, she finished cum Laude at University of the Philippines Manila BS biology.