Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Categories
Search by Format
Search by Type
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By
  • WEBINAR - Nonprescription Drugs and Lactation: Helping Families Make Informed Decisions

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1.00 credit offered Includes a Live Event on 05/14/2018 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    The use of nonprescription products by breastfeeding mothers is even more common than the use of prescription drugs. Pharmacists, doctors, and lactation consultants must be able to provide proper advice on the use or safety of nonprescription products during breastfeeding. The presentation on breastfeeding and nonprescription drugs will provide the necessary information to do so. Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Nonprescription Drugs and Lactation: Helping Families Make Informed Decisions

    The use of nonprescription products by breastfeeding mothers is even more common than
    the use of prescription drugs.  Pharmacists, doctors, and lactation consultants must be able to provide proper advice on the use or safety of  nonprescription products during breastfeeding. The presentation on breastfeeding and nonprescription drugs will provide the necessary information to do so.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Webinar 14 May 2018

    Presented by: Frank J. Nice, RPh, DPA, CPHP

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Identify sources of  information for nonprescription medication use during breastfeeding
    • Utilize current concepts regarding the use of nonprescription medications during breastfeeding

    Learning Level: Beginner/Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Frank J. Nice

    RPh, DPA, CPHP

    Dr. Frank J. Nice has practiced as a consultant, lecturer, and author on medications and breastfeeding for over 40 years. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Pharmacy, a Masters Degree in Pharmacy Administration, Master’s and Doctorate Degrees in Public Administration, and Certification in Public Health Pharmacy. He retired after 43 years of government service, including 30 years of distinguished service with the US Public Health Service. He currently is self-employed as a consultant and President, Nice Breastfeeding LLC. Dr. Nice has published Nonprescription Drugs for the Breastfeeding Mother, The Galactogogue Recipe Book, and Recreational Drugs and Drugs Used To Treat Addicted Mothers: Impact on Pregnancy and Breastfeeding. Dr. Nice has also authored over four dozen peer-reviewed articles on the use of prescription medications, recreational drugs, Over-the-Counter (OTC) products, and herbals during breastfeeding. He has organized and participated in over 50 medical missions to the country of Haiti.

  • DOCUMENT - International Code of Marketing

    Contains 4 Component(s), 3.00 credits offered

    The learner will be able to: Describe three events leading up to the Code; Explain the aim of the Code; Explain the products covered under the Code; Recognize potential conflicts of interest in the health care system with regard to the Code; List three potential violations of the Code. Credit: 3 E CERPs and 3 Contact Hours

    Source: Code Essentials 3: Responsibilities of Health Workers under the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes and subsequent WHA resolutions, International Baby Food Action Network (IBFAN), 2009

    The learner will be able to:

    • Describe three events leading up to the Code.
    • Explain the aim of the Code.
    • Explain the products covered under the Code.
    • Recognize potential conflicts of interest in the health care system with regard to the Code.
    • List three potential violations of the Code.

    There are 50 multiple choice questions.

    You will have two attempts to achieve a passing score of 70% on this module.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

  • Lactation Clinical Instruction Curriculum Part 3 of 5

    Contains 4 Component(s), 2.00 credits offered

    Clinical Instruction Course 3: Logistics and Mechanics delves more deeply into the logistics and mechanics of clinical education, as well as competency development and documentation. Evaluating, validating, verifying, and documenting clinical competency are all explored. Credit: 2 L CERPs and 2 Contact Hours

    Clinical Instruction Course 3: Logistics and Mechanics

    Instructor: Phyllis Kombol, MSN, RNC-NIC, IBCLC, RLC

    Course Description: This course is part of a 5-course curriculum (described below) which is designed to assist IBCLCs who are helping others develop the clinical skills and competencies needed to become effective members of the Lactation Consulting profession. The 5 courses in the curriculum are based on webinar and conference presentations recorded in 2015 through the International Lactation Consultant Association. Students may enroll in separate courses. However, to prepare for working as a clinical instructor, all five courses and the required reading are recommended. It is recommended that the required reading be completed before beginning the courses.

    Clinical Instruction Course 3: Logistics and Mechanics delves more deeply into the logistics and mechanics of clinical education, as well as competency development and documentation. Evaluating, validating, verifying, and documenting clinical competency are all explored.          

    Learner Objectives Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Identify 3 major areas of clinical instruction logistics.
    • Apply at least one new/improved clinical instruction technique.
    • Evaluate, validate, verify, and document lactation clinical competency.

    Learning Level: Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The instructor received an honorarium as a co-author of the text used in this course.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    _________________________________________________________________

    Lactation Clinical Instruction Curriculum

    Length: 10 hours [All 5 courses]

    Required reading: Clinical Instruction in Lactation: Teaching the Next Generation. International Lactation Consultant Association, 2012.

    Course 1: Fundamental Foundations, Designs and Structures—2 hours

    • Requirements for certification and fundamental principles of lactation clinical instruction
    • Designs for lactation clinical education programs
    • Supportive elements of lactation clinical education structures

    Materials:

    • Recorded presentation
    • PDF handout of presentation slides
    • Worksheet
    • References

    Course 2: People, Prerequisites, and Processes—2 hours

    • Content and processes for selection of potential clinicians
    • Clinical instructor recruitment, support, and sustained effectiveness
    • Adaptations and evaluation processes for different learners, didactic preparation, and learning situations

    Materials:

    • Recorded presentation
    • PDF handout of presentation slides
    • Worksheet
    • References

    Course 3: Logistics and Mechanics—2 hours

    • Areas of clinical instruction logistics
    • Clinical instruction technique
    • Evaluating, validating, verifying, and documenting clinical competency

    Materials:

    • Recorded presentation
    • Recording not heard during presentation
    • PDF handout of presentation slides
    • Worksheet
    • References

    Course 4: Teaching and Providing Feedback—2 hours

    • Clinical education models
    • Clinical instruction methods and skills
    • Teaching clinical lactation skills

    Materials:

    • Recorded presentation
    • PDF handout of presentation slides
    • Activity
    • References

    Course 5: Public Speaking and Presentation Skills—2 hours

    • Skills to improve public speaking and presentations
    • Requesting, receiving, and offering feedback
    • Practicing skills
    • Committing to change

    Materials:

    • Recorded presentation
    • PDF handout of presentation slides
    • Activity
    • Handout
    • Worksheet

    Phyllis Kombol

    RNC, MSN, IBCLC, RLC

    Phyllis Kombol is an experienced educator, lactation consultant, Parent-Child Clinical Specialist, and NICU certified RN. Her job includes clinical lactation care in both inpatient and outpatient settings, as well as mentoring lactation clinical interns. She is the co-author of ILCA’s 2012 Clinical Instruction in Lactation: Teaching the Next Generation, contributes to clinical instruction efforts in ILCA, participates in ILCA’s equity initiative, and is part of the NICU Baby Friendly Task Force. She is a member of several nursing and lactation professional organizations, and teaches webinars and conferences several times each year. She has been an active member of Toastmasters International since 2008.

  • Lactation Clinical Instuction Part 4 of 5

    Contains 4 Component(s), 2.00 credits offered

    Clinical Instruction Course 4: Teaching and Providing Feedback explores models for clinical education that are tailored to varying degrees of proficiency and experience. Teaching methods and providing feedback to interns are also addressed. Credit: 2 L CERPs and 2 Contact Hours

    Clinical Instruction Course 4: Teaching and Providing Feedback

    Instructor: Phyllis Kombol, MSN, RNC-NIC, IBCLC, RLC

    Course Description: This course is part of a 5-course curriculum (described below) which is designed to assist IBCLCs who are helping others develop the clinical skills and competencies needed to become effective members of the Lactation Consulting profession. The 5 courses in the curriculum are based on webinar and conference presentations recorded in 2015 through the International Lactation Consultant Association. Students may enroll in separate courses. However, to prepare for working as a clinical instructor, all five courses and the required reading are recommended. It is recommended that the required reading be completed before beginning the courses.

    Clinical Instruction Course 4: Teaching and Providing Feedback explores models for clinical education that are tailored to varying degrees of proficiency and experience. Teaching methods and providing feedback to interns are also addressed.

    Learner Objectives Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Compare and contrast different clinical education models.
    • Compare and contrast different clinical instruction methods and skills.
    • Practice at least 3 different ways to teach clinical lactation skills.

    Learning Level: Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The instructor received an honorarium as a co-author of the text used in this course.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    _________________________________________________________________

    Lactation Clinical Instruction Curriculum

    Length: 10 hours [All 5 courses]

    Required reading: Clinical Instruction in Lactation: Teaching the Next Generation. International Lactation Consultant Association, 2012.

    Course 1: Fundamental Foundations, Designs and Structures—2 hours

    • Requirements for certification and fundamental principles of lactation clinical instruction
    • Designs for lactation clinical education programs
    • Supportive elements of lactation clinical education structures

    Materials:

    • Recorded presentation
    • PDF handout of presentation slides
    • Worksheet
    • References

    Course 2: People, Prerequisites, and Processes—2 hours

    • Content and processes for selection of potential clinicians
    • Clinical instructor recruitment, support, and sustained effectiveness
    • Adaptations and evaluation processes for different learners, didactic preparation, and learning situations

    Materials:

    • Recorded presentation
    • PDF handout of presentation slides
    • Worksheet
    • References

    Course 3: Logistics and Mechanics—2 hours

    • Areas of clinical instruction logistics
    • Clinical instruction technique
    • Evaluating, validating, verifying, and documenting clinical competency

    Materials:

    • Recorded presentation
    • Recording not heard during presentation
    • PDF handout of presentation slides
    • Worksheet
    • References

    Course 4: Teaching and Providing Feedback—2 hours

    • Clinical education models
    • Clinical instruction methods and skills
    • Teaching clinical lactation skills

    Materials:

    • Recorded presentation
    • PDF handout of presentation slides
    • Activity
    • References

    Course 5: Public Speaking and Presentation Skills—2 hours

    • Skills to improve public speaking and presentations
    • Requesting, receiving, and offering feedback
    • Practicing skills
    • Committing to change

    Materials:

    • Recorded presentation
    • PDF handout of presentation slides
    • Activity
    • Handout
    • Worksheet

    Phyllis Kombol

    RNC, MSN, IBCLC, RLC

    Phyllis Kombol is an experienced educator, lactation consultant, Parent-Child Clinical Specialist, and NICU certified RN. Her job includes clinical lactation care in both inpatient and outpatient settings, as well as mentoring lactation clinical interns. She is the co-author of ILCA’s 2012 Clinical Instruction in Lactation: Teaching the Next Generation, contributes to clinical instruction efforts in ILCA, participates in ILCA’s equity initiative, and is part of the NICU Baby Friendly Task Force. She is a member of several nursing and lactation professional organizations, and teaches webinars and conferences several times each year. She has been an active member of Toastmasters International since 2008.

  • Lactation Clinical Instuction Part 5 of 5

    Contains 4 Component(s), 2.00 credits offered

    Clinical Instruction Course 5: Public Speaking and Presentation Skills focuses on skills in public speaking and professional presentations that are critical for clinical instructors. Course activities provide practice in requesting, receiving, and offering feedback on presentation skills. Credit: 2 L CERPs and 2 Contact Hours

    Clinical Instruction Course 5: Public Speaking and Presentation Skills

    Instructor: Phyllis Kombol, MSN, RNC-NIC, IBCLC, RLC

    Course Description: This course is part of a 5-course curriculum (described below) which is designed to assist IBCLCs who are helping others develop the clinical skills and competencies needed to become effective members of the Lactation Consulting profession. The 5 courses in the curriculum are based on webinar and conference presentations recorded in 2015 through the International Lactation Consultant Association. Students may enroll in separate courses. However, to prepare for working as a clinical instructor, all five courses and the required reading are recommended. It is recommended that the required reading be completed before beginning the courses.

    Clinical Instruction Course 5: Public Speaking and Presentation Skills focuses on skills in public speaking and professional presentations that are critical for clinical instructors. Course activities provide practice in requesting, receiving, and offering feedback on presentation skills.

    Learner Objectives Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Identify skills to improve public speaking and presentations.
    • Request, receive, and offer feedback on public speaking style.
    • Commit to changing public speaking techniques.

    Learning Level: Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The instructor received an honorarium as a co-author of the text used in this course.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    _________________________________________________________________

    Lactation Clinical Instruction Curriculum

    Length: 10 hours [All 5 courses]

    Required reading: Clinical Instruction in Lactation: Teaching the Next Generation. International Lactation Consultant Association, 2012.

    Course 1: Fundamental Foundations, Designs and Structures—2 hours

    • Requirements for certification and fundamental principles of lactation clinical instruction
    • Designs for lactation clinical education programs
    • Supportive elements of lactation clinical education structures

    Materials:

    • Recorded presentation
    • PDF handout of presentation slides
    • Worksheet
    • References

    Course 2: People, Prerequisites, and Processes—2 hours

    • Content and processes for selection of potential clinicians
    • Clinical instructor recruitment, support, and sustained effectiveness
    • Adaptations and evaluation processes for different learners, didactic preparation, and learning situations

    Materials:

    • Recorded presentation
    • PDF handout of presentation slides
    • Worksheet
    • References

    Course 3: Logistics and Mechanics—2 hours

    • Areas of clinical instruction logistics
    • Clinical instruction technique
    • Evaluating, validating, verifying, and documenting clinical competency

    Materials:

    • Recorded presentation
    • Recording not heard during presentation
    • PDF handout of presentation slides
    • Worksheet
    • References

    Course 4: Teaching and Providing Feedback—2 hours

    • Clinical education models
    • Clinical instruction methods and skills
    • Teaching clinical lactation skills

    Materials:

    • Recorded presentation
    • PDF handout of presentation slides
    • Activity
    • References

    Course 5: Public Speaking and Presentation Skills—2 hours

    • Skills to improve public speaking and presentations
    • Requesting, receiving, and offering feedback
    • Practicing skills
    • Committing to change

    Materials:

    • Recorded presentation
    • PDF handout of presentation slides
    • Activity
    • Handout
    • Worksheet

    Phyllis Kombol

    RNC, MSN, IBCLC, RLC

    Phyllis Kombol is an experienced educator, lactation consultant, Parent-Child Clinical Specialist, and NICU certified RN. Her job includes clinical lactation care in both inpatient and outpatient settings, as well as mentoring lactation clinical interns. She is the co-author of ILCA’s 2012 Clinical Instruction in Lactation: Teaching the Next Generation, contributes to clinical instruction efforts in ILCA, participates in ILCA’s equity initiative, and is part of the NICU Baby Friendly Task Force. She is a member of several nursing and lactation professional organizations, and teaches webinars and conferences several times each year. She has been an active member of Toastmasters International since 2008.

  • WEBINAR - Case Studies on the Referral of Infants for Bodywork: Clinical Signs and Lactation Outcomes

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1.50 credits offered Recorded On: 03/01/2018

    The concept of bodywork for infants with breastfeeding difficulties is still new (especially outside of the USA) and there is not much published evidence to support it. However, clinical experience seems to suggest that bodywork is a useful tool to help some infants. Through the presentation of case studies, this webinar shares clinical experience related to common questions asked by lactation specialists: When might bodywork help a baby? To whom can I refer the infant? What might the results be? Credit: 1.5 L CERPs and 1.5 Contact Hours

    Case Studies on the Referral of Infants for Bodywork: Clinical Signs and Lactation Outcomes

    The concept of bodywork for infants with breastfeeding difficulties is still new (especially outside of the USA) and there is not much published evidence to support it. However, clinical experience seems to suggest that bodywork is a useful tool to help some infants. Through the presentation of case studies, this webinar shares clinical experience related to common questions asked by lactation specialists: When might bodywork help a baby? To whom can I refer the infant? What might the results be?

    Credit: 1.5 L CERPs and 1.5 Contact Hours

    Source: ILCA Webinar 1 March 2018

    Presented by: Carmela (Kika) Baeza, MD, IBCLC

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • List signs of infant sucking difficulties.
    • Describe markers that suggest an infant´s breastfeeding/chestfeeding difficulties may benefit from bodywork.
    • Explain how to develop a local referral network of bodywork professionals.

    Learning Level: Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Carmela Baeza

    MD, IBCLC

    Carmela Baeza, MD, IBCLC, RLC, is a physician and lactation consultant, specialized in family medicine and in sexual therapy in Madrid, Spain. She has a Bachelor´s degree in Public Health Education. She became an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) in 2005 and was a member of ILCA a year before that. She has been a Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative Evaluator since 2006. She works in a private family wellness clinic, Raices, where she is in charge of the lactation program. She also teaches natural family planning (Symptothermal Method and Lactational Amenorrhea Method) and is the current president of the Asociación Española de Consultoras Certificadas en Lactancia Materna (Spanish Lactation Consultant Association). Over the past seven years she has coordinated more than 40 breastfeeding courses in which the educational team she directs—comprised of four IBCLCs, two nurses, a pediatrician, and a midwife—has trained over three thousand doctors, midwives, and nurses from both the Spanish National Health Service and the private sector in Spain.

  • CONF 2016 Growth Charts: Use and Misuse

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1.00 credit offered

    In this session, Dr. Gonzalez reviews the correct way to use growth charts to determine growth in nurslings. Through several case studies, he illustrates normal growth and development, how normal growth and development vary significantly, and how the misuse of growth charts can lead to babies being labeled as having problems when they are not at all having problems. Dr. Gonzalez is both knowledgeable about the subject matter and entertaining in its presentation. Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Growth Charts: Use and Misuse

    In this session, Dr. Gonzalez reviews the correct way to use growth charts to determine growth in nurslings. Through several case studies, he illustrates normal growth and development, how normal growth and development vary significantly, and how the misuse of growth charts can lead to babies being labeled as having problems when they are not at all having problems. Dr. Gonzalez is both knowledgeable about the subject matter and entertaining in its presentation.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference 2016

    Presented by: Carlos González, MD

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Explain how to assess weight and height using growth charts
    • Describe the variability of normal human growth
    • Discuss how growth assessment can do harm

    Learning Level: All

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Carlos González

    MD

    Dr. Carlos González is an international speaker, author, and pediatrician in private practice. He has lectured at breastfeeding conferences, seminars, and courses throughout Europe and the Americas. He has a long history of engaging in breastfeeding promotion, including serving as a member of the International Baby Food Action Network (IBFAN) since 1986 and as the founder and president of the Catalan Breastfeeding Association since 1991. He has written numerous books and other publications about breastfeeding, which have been translated from Spanish into German, Italian, English, Japanese, Catalan, French, Turkish, Polish, Serbian, and Russian. He has translated several breastfeeding publications into Catalan and Spanish. He is the father of three breastfed children.

  • CONF 2016 Lactation Education for Healthcare Providers: Evolving Curriculum to Improve Breastfeeding Support

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1.00 credit offered

    All members of the healthcare team must be knowledgeable about lactation management in order to provide optimal support to dyads and increase breastfeeding rates. The speaker examines the important role that healthcare providers play in promoting and supporting lactation and presents the findings of her dissertation on current inconsistencies in lactation education in graduate healthcare programs. She then describes the development of a free, evidence-based, computer-delivered lactation education program designed to improve breastfeeding knowledge, attitudes, and practices of healthcare providers. Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Lactation Education for Healthcare Providers: Evolving Curriculum to Improve Breastfeeding Support

    All members of the healthcare team must be knowledgeable about lactation management in order to provide optimal support to dyads and increase breastfeeding rates. The speaker examines the important role that healthcare providers play in promoting and supporting lactation and presents the findings of her dissertation on current inconsistencies in lactation education in graduate healthcare programs. She then describes the development of a free, evidence-based, computer-delivered lactation education program designed to improve breastfeeding knowledge, attitudes, and practices of healthcare providers.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference 2016

    Presented by: Cara Riek, DNP, RN, FNP-BC, IBCLC

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Identify inconsistencies in lactation education courses offered in graduate healthcare programs
    • Examine the role of healthcare providers play in promoting breastfeeding
    • Describe methods of improving lactation education in graduate healthcare programs

    Learning Level: Intermediate/Advanced

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Cara Riek

    DNP, RN, FNP-BC, IBCLC

    Dr. Riek has earned her Doctor of Nursing Practice from Arizona State University, United States.  Her specialization in Family Practice, with an emphasis on dyad care.  She is also International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, serves as a La Leche League leader in north Phoenix valley, and has completed Certified Lactation Educator (CLE) and Certified Lactation Management (CLM) courses. She has counseled numerous mother-baby pairs on breastfeeding. Her doctoral project is focused on providing lactation education to healthcare providers. She also dedicates time to educating healthcare providers in Phoenix, Arizona on necessary education to provide care and support for mother-baby dyads.

  • CONF 2016 Skin to Skin Care Decreases Procedural Pain for Newborns

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1.00 credit offered

    In this compelling session, the speakers identify the negative consequences of newborn exposure to numerous painful procedures after delivery and discuss how parent-provided skin-to-skin care can decrease procedural pain in newborns no matter how they are fed. They present the results of the pilot study they conducted at a Baby Friendly designated hospital in the United States. The session describes how they used a PICO question (Problem or Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcomes) to encourage their facility to question its current practices, examine the evidence, and change to engaging in evidence-based practice to reduce newborn pain. The PICO question was “For newborns born at more than 37 weeks gestation, does the use of skin-to-skin care reduce procedural pain?” The study showed a significant reduction of procedural pain in newborns receiving skin-to-skin care. Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Skin to Skin Care Decreases Procedural Pain for Newborns

    In this compelling session, the speakers identify the negative consequences of newborn exposure to numerous painful procedures after delivery and discuss how parent-provided skin-to-skin care can decrease procedural pain in newborns no matter how they are fed. They present the results of the pilot study they conducted at a Baby Friendly designated hospital in the United States. The session describes how they used a PICO question (Problem or Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcomes) to encourage their facility to question its current practices, examine the evidence, and change to engaging in evidence-based practice to reduce newborn pain. The PICO question was “For newborns born at more than 37 weeks gestation, does the use of skin-to-skin care reduce procedural pain?” The study showed a significant reduction of procedural pain in newborns receiving skin-to-skin care.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference 2016

    Presented by: Rebecca Law, RN, MA, IBCLC, ANLC and Kimberly Williams, RNC-MNN, BSN

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • List two negative consequences of newborn exposure to numerous painful procedures
    • Explain how to use skin-to-skin care to decrease procedural pain in newborns
    • Describe the outcome of a pilot study showing significant reduction of procedural pain in newborns receiving skin-to-skin care

    Learning Level: Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Rebecca Law

    RN, MA, IBCLC, ANLC

    Kimberly Williams

    RNC-MNN, BSN

    Kim Williams, RNC, BSN, is the mother-baby nurse manager of the Maternal Newborn Postpartum Unit at the Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital in downtown, Fort Worth, Texas United States. She has the passion to improve outcome for postpartum mothers and their newborns. As an advocate for skin-to-skin care, she and her team implemented skin-to-skin care as a best practice to decrease newborn procedural pain. She has serve as the manager for her unit for 10 years. She has been committed to Texas Health Resources for over 18 years. Their woman's service department has been re-designated as a Baby Friendly Hospital. They have won the local recognition of "The Best Place to Have a Baby" for 19 years.

  • CONF 2016 The Affective Needs of Children: Crying and the Need for Comforting

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1.00 credit offered

    In this humorous but evidence-based session, Dr. Carlos González, offers a delightful, basic review of why human infants need to be near their mothers/caregivers, and why carrying and keeping infants near, even during sleep, is a developmentally appropriate response to the innate proximity-seeking behaviors exhibited by all infants. He explains from a biological and anthropological perspective why infant separation is not normal for human survival. In the words of the speaker, “Children all over the world, just like the offspring of many other species, want to be with their mothers all day (and night) long, want to be carried, and cry when separated from their mothers. But, many people in our western industrialized culture see that as abnormal. Our children are not our enemies. They want to be with us, because they love us. A lot.” Credit: 1 R CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    The Affective Needs of Children: Crying and the Need for Comforting

    In this humorous but evidence-based session, Dr. Carlos González, offers a delightful, basic review of why human infants need to be near their mothers/caregivers, and why carrying and keeping infants near, even during sleep, is a developmentally appropriate response to the innate proximity-seeking behaviors exhibited by all infants. He explains from a biological and anthropological perspective why infant separation is not normal for human survival. In the words of the speaker, “Children all over the world, just like the offspring of many other species, want to be with their mothers all day (and night) long, want to be carried, and cry when separated from their mothers. But, many people in our western industrialized culture see that as abnormal. Our children are not our enemies. They want to be with us, because they love us. A lot.”

    Credit: 1 R CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference 2016

    Presented by: Carlos González, MD

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Describe why babies want to be carried
    • Explain why babies don’t want to sleep alone
    • Compare mother and infant behavior in different species and cultures

    Learning Level: Beginner/Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Carlos González

    MD

    Dr. Carlos González is an international speaker, author, and pediatrician in private practice. He has lectured at breastfeeding conferences, seminars, and courses throughout Europe and the Americas. He has a long history of engaging in breastfeeding promotion, including serving as a member of the International Baby Food Action Network (IBFAN) since 1986 and as the founder and president of the Catalan Breastfeeding Association since 1991. He has written numerous books and other publications about breastfeeding, which have been translated from Spanish into German, Italian, English, Japanese, Catalan, French, Turkish, Polish, Serbian, and Russian. He has translated several breastfeeding publications into Catalan and Spanish. He is the father of three breastfed children.