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  • CONF 2018 The Return of Breastsleeping: Humankind’s Oldest and Most Successful Sleep and Feeding Arrangement

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/19/2018

    To introduce and justify a new conceptual epidemiological category, breastsleeping, that makes distinctions physiologically and behaviorally between the breastfeeding-bedsharing mother-baby dyad and the bottle or formula-fed bed-sharing dyad. We argue that breastsleeping is an evolved integrated system in which maternal sleep, infant sleep, and breastfeeding patterns can be explained. We argue that breastsleeping behavior deserves to be recognized as legitimate and acceptably safe for bedsharing when practiced (as its definition suggests) in the absence of all known hazardous factors. This argument reflects the full application of evidence based medicine, unlike the AAP's recommendation against bedsharing under any circumstances which violates the most important evidence based medicine requirement like respecting patient values, and generating hypothesis for testing epidemiological findings before moving to sweeping public health recommendations. Parental biology including hormonal profiles of mothers and fathers and characteristic reflexes of the human infant are used to explain the powerful underlying motives and emotions felt by infants and parents alike that explain why breastsleeping will not be eradicated.

    The Return of Breastsleeping: Humankind's Oldest and Most Successful Sleep and Feeding Arrangement

    To introduce and justify a new conceptual epidemiological category, breastsleeping, that makes distinctions physiologically and behaviorally between the breastfeeding-bedsharing mother-baby dyad and the bottle or formula-fed bed-sharing dyad. We argue that breastsleeping is an evolved integrated system in which maternal sleep, infant sleep, and breastfeeding patterns can be explained. We argue that breastsleeping behavior deserves to be recognized as legitimate and acceptably safe for bedsharing when practiced (as its definition suggests) in the absence of all known hazardous factors. This argument reflects the full application of evidence based medicine, unlike the AAP's recommendation against bedsharing under any circumstances which violates the most important evidence based medicine requirement like respecting patient values, and generating hypothesis for testing epidemiological findings before moving to sweeping public health recommendations. Parental biology including hormonal profiles of mothers and fathers and characteristic reflexes of the human infant are used to explain the powerful underlying motives and emotions felt by infants and parents alike that explain why breastsleeping will not be eradicated.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2018 - Portland, Oregon, USA

    Presented by: James McKenna PhD

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Learners will be able to understand what breastsleeping is and how and why millions of mothers breastsleep i.e. sleep next to their infants (either on the same or a different surface) to breastfeed, absent of hazardous factors despite medical authoritative attempts to eradicate it.
    • Learners will know how the biology underlying the parental response to infants make it predictable that especially breastfeeding mothers will instinctly reach for their infants in the middle of the night, and why infants are so hard to resist, which is due in part to biological cues given by infants biologically processed by adult receptor cells specifically designed to respond to those same infantile signals.
    • a) Learners will know how and why AAP based infant sleep recommendations do not conform to, nor do they reflect evidence based medicine principles, as is claimed by the AAP. b) Learners will know how breastsleeping (bedsharing with breastfeeding in the absence of hazardous factors) differs behaviorally  and physiologically from bottle or formula feeding bedsharing, thus making it acceptably safe. c) Learners will know the ethical challenges health professionals and especially lactation counselors face by being told they will be fired from their professional positions if they share what they know with their clients and patients about safer cosleeping in the form of breastsleeping or any kind of bedsharing.

    Learning Level: All

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below. 

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    James McKenna

    PhD

    James McKenna pioneered the first behavioral and electro-physiological studies documenting differences between mothers and infants sleeping together and apart and has become known worldwide for his work in promoting studies of breastfeeding and mother-infant cosleeping. He is a biological anthropologist and Director of the Mother-Baby Behavioral Sleep Laboratory at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana, United States. He began his career studying the social behavior and development of monkeys and apes with an emphasis on parenting behavior and ecology. He has published over 150 articles and six books, including a popular parenting book Sleeping With Your Baby: A Parent’s Guide To Co-sleeping. He has co-edited Ancestral Landscapes In Human Evolution, Evolutionary Medicine, and a more recent co-edited volume Evolution and Health: New Perspectives. He won the prestigious Shannon Award (with Dr. Sarah Mosko) from the National Institutes of Child Health and Development for his Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) research and is the United State's foremost authority and spokesperson to the national press on issues pertaining to infant and childhood sleep problems, sleep development, and breastfeeding. Most recently, Dr. McKenna has published a new paper with Lee Gettler proposing a new concept, breastsleeping, to promote the idea that 1) breastfeeding-bedsharing infants are acceptably safe compared with bottle-feeding or formula-feeding infants, and 2) breastsleeping is part of the same inextricable, adaptive system that makes studying normal healthy infant sleep, maternal sleep, or normal breastfeeding patterns separate from each other inaccurate and/or invalid.

  • CONF 2018 SIDS and Colic: Do They Share the Same Breathing Control System Origin?

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/19/2018

    We here present a new set of hypotheses proposing that inconsolable crying and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), seemingly remarkably different outcomes may stem from the same human biological vulnerability characteristic not identified in other species. A model stresses the development over the 2-7 month of life of shared control of breathing made possible by the gradual integration of learned, volatile control of breathing underlying vocalizations (based on higher cortex nuclei) with involuntary or tidal breathing (based on chemoreceptor or brainstem nuclei), a system of respiratory control required for language, specifically speech breathing. It is proposed that because of this adaption infants could be subject to two different neurological glitches: SIDS reflects a missed signal as when infants transition between REM and NREM sleep while dreaming. That is, during REM sleep infants willfully participate in their breathing but during transitions either into REM or out of it the signal from one to the other control system is inadequate or missed altogether. As regards to colic, it is proposed that infants can initiate a cry and the voluntary breath required to sustain it but cannot stop it as both voice and breath become locked together with both systems excitatory neurons firing at the same time. Upon realizing that it cannot stop crying, in fear, the infant does more or what it is trying to reverse, to cry.

    SIDS and Colic: Do They Share the Same Breathing Control System Origin?

    We here present a new set of hypotheses proposing that inconsolable crying and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), seemingly remarkably different outcomes may stem from the same human biological vulnerability characteristic not identified in other species. A model stresses the development over the 2-7 month of life of shared control of breathing made possible by the gradual integration of learned, volatile control of breathing underlying vocalizations (based on higher cortex nuclei) with involuntary or tidal breathing (based on chemoreceptor or brainstem nuclei), a system of respiratory control required for language, specifically speech breathing. It is proposed that because of this adaption infants could be subject to two different neurological glitches: SIDS reflects a missed signal as when infants transition between REM and NREM sleep while dreaming. That is, during REM sleep infants willfully participate in their breathing but during transitions either into REM or out of it the signal from one to the other control system is inadequate or missed altogether.  As regards to colic, it is proposed that infants can initiate a cry and the voluntary breath required to sustain it but cannot stop it as both voice and breath become locked together with both systems excitatory neurons firing at the same time. Upon realizing that it cannot stop crying, in fear, the infant does more or what it is trying to reverse, to cry.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2018 - Portland, Oregon, USA

    Presented by: James McKenna PhD

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • The learner will be able to understand the neurobiology that makes human breathing control species-specific, unique (necessary for language) and why we posit the testable hypothesis that the SIDS-Colic neurological control glitches possibly reflect a lack of developmental synchrony, between stop-go crying activities, as regards to colic (infant can begin a cry but not reverse it), and transitions between Rem-NEM during sleep (where infants go in and out of purposeful control of breathing while they dream) as regards SIDS. We hypothesize that there is a missing or inefficient signal to permit the infant to willfully break the apnea by cortical intervention. In each of these scenarios we are positioning a mis-communication or missed signal or between cortical or subcortical neural tracts creating adaptive failures exacerbated by prolonged parent-infant separation, whether night or day. This would be due to one or the other subsystem of neural networks and/or their functioning nuclei not being equally mature or able to sufficiently send, detect, or respond, to signals occurring between the subsystems, particularly in regards to SIDS, while asleep, and colic, while awake.
    • Learner will be taught exactly how and in what ways, breastsleeping and the benefits conferred as infants experience the sensory changes that comprise it and are predicted to serve to accelerate the maturity and/or full integration of the voluntary with involuntary respiratory sub-systems in general, and at very least provide alternative sensory neuro-pathways (back-ups) potentially helping to buffer human infants through this very narrow period of less stable breathing as infants transition to ultimately a more versatile form of breathing control necessary for speech.
    • Learner will know that SIDS and colic peak at the same time and that beginning around one month, during sleep and awake periods, infants gradually learn to shift between volitional (voluntary) and automatic (involuntary) breathing and voice control. This is based on developing functional interconnections between cortical (higher brain) and lower sub-cortical neural (respiratory) networks. The existence of sudden infant death syndrome and inconsolable crying may reflect adaptive failures due to this unique human respiratory system necessary for speech exacerbated by prolonged parent-infant separation, whether night or day, due to one or the other subsystem of neural networks and/or their functioning nuclei not being equally mature or able to sufficiently send, detect, or respond to signals occurring between these sub-systems, particularly in regards to SIDS, the cortex is not alerted to awaken the infant so that it can willfully and with purpose, terminate the apnea by breathing.

    Learning Level: All

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below. 

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    James McKenna

    PhD

    James McKenna pioneered the first behavioral and electro-physiological studies documenting differences between mothers and infants sleeping together and apart and has become known worldwide for his work in promoting studies of breastfeeding and mother-infant cosleeping. He is a biological anthropologist and Director of the Mother-Baby Behavioral Sleep Laboratory at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana, United States. He began his career studying the social behavior and development of monkeys and apes with an emphasis on parenting behavior and ecology. He has published over 150 articles and six books, including a popular parenting book Sleeping With Your Baby: A Parent’s Guide To Co-sleeping. He has co-edited Ancestral Landscapes In Human Evolution, Evolutionary Medicine, and a more recent co-edited volume Evolution and Health: New Perspectives. He won the prestigious Shannon Award (with Dr. Sarah Mosko) from the National Institutes of Child Health and Development for his Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) research and is the United State's foremost authority and spokesperson to the national press on issues pertaining to infant and childhood sleep problems, sleep development, and breastfeeding. Most recently, Dr. McKenna has published a new paper with Lee Gettler proposing a new concept, breastsleeping, to promote the idea that 1) breastfeeding-bedsharing infants are acceptably safe compared with bottle-feeding or formula-feeding infants, and 2) breastsleeping is part of the same inextricable, adaptive system that makes studying normal healthy infant sleep, maternal sleep, or normal breastfeeding patterns separate from each other inaccurate and/or invalid.

  • WEBINAR - Nonprescription Drugs and Lactation: Helping Families Make Informed Decisions

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 05/14/2018

    The use of nonprescription products by breastfeeding mothers is even more common than the use of prescription drugs. Pharmacists, doctors, and lactation consultants must be able to provide proper advice on the use or safety of nonprescription products during breastfeeding. The presentation on breastfeeding and nonprescription drugs will provide the necessary information to do so. Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Nonprescription Drugs and Lactation: Helping Families Make Informed Decisions

    The use of nonprescription products by breastfeeding mothers is even more common than
    the use of prescription drugs.  Pharmacists, doctors, and lactation consultants must be able to provide proper advice on the use or safety of  nonprescription products during breastfeeding. The presentation on breastfeeding and nonprescription drugs will provide the necessary information to do so.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Webinar 14 May 2018

    Presented by: Frank J. Nice, RPh, DPA, CPHP

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Identify sources of  information for nonprescription medication use during breastfeeding
    • Utilize current concepts regarding the use of nonprescription medications during breastfeeding

    Learning Level: Beginner/Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Frank J. Nice

    RPh, DPA, CPHP

    Dr. Frank J. Nice has practiced as a consultant, lecturer, and author on medications and breastfeeding for over 40 years. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Pharmacy, a Masters Degree in Pharmacy Administration, Master’s and Doctorate Degrees in Public Administration, and Certification in Public Health Pharmacy. He retired after 43 years of government service, including 30 years of distinguished service with the US Public Health Service. He currently is self-employed as a consultant and President, Nice Breastfeeding LLC. Dr. Nice has published Nonprescription Drugs for the Breastfeeding Mother, The Galactogogue Recipe Book, and Recreational Drugs and Drugs Used To Treat Addicted Mothers: Impact on Pregnancy and Breastfeeding. Dr. Nice has also authored over four dozen peer-reviewed articles on the use of prescription medications, recreational drugs, Over-the-Counter (OTC) products, and herbals during breastfeeding. He has organized and participated in over 50 medical missions to the country of Haiti.

  • WEBINAR - Marijuana and Other Recreational Drugs During Pregnancy and Lactation: Recommendations, Assessment, Counseling, and Ethics

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This session aims to improve pregnancy and breastfeeding outcomes by helping young women engage in good preventative health practices, including reducing use of cigarettes, alcohol, and illegal substances, including marijuana. After completing this module, participants will be able to help parents provide responsible and competent care for their children, and develop a vision and plan for future pregnancies and breastfeeding. Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Marijuana and Other Recreational Drugs During Pregnancy and Lactation: Recommendations, Assessment, Counseling, and Ethics

    This session aims to improve pregnancy and breastfeeding outcomes by helping young women engage in good preventative health practices, including reducing use of cigarettes, alcohol, and illegal substances, including marijuana.  After completing this module, participants will be able to help parents provide responsible and competent care for their children, and develop a vision and plan for future pregnancies and breastfeeding.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Webinar 14 May 2018

    Presented by: Frank J. Nice, RPh, DPA, CPHP

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Effectively evaluate recreational drug  use during breastfeeding and pregnancy
    • Counsel mothers who are pregnant or breastfeeding and using recreational drugs, including marijuana
    • Evaluate ethical concerns regarding marijuana use

    Learning Level: Beginner/Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Frank J. Nice

    RPh, DPA, CPHP

    Dr. Frank J. Nice has practiced as a consultant, lecturer, and author on medications and breastfeeding for over 40 years. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Pharmacy, a Masters Degree in Pharmacy Administration, Master’s and Doctorate Degrees in Public Administration, and Certification in Public Health Pharmacy. He retired after 43 years of government service, including 30 years of distinguished service with the US Public Health Service. He currently is self-employed as a consultant and President, Nice Breastfeeding LLC. Dr. Nice has published Nonprescription Drugs for the Breastfeeding Mother, The Galactogogue Recipe Book, and Recreational Drugs and Drugs Used To Treat Addicted Mothers: Impact on Pregnancy and Breastfeeding. Dr. Nice has also authored over four dozen peer-reviewed articles on the use of prescription medications, recreational drugs, Over-the-Counter (OTC) products, and herbals during breastfeeding. He has organized and participated in over 50 medical missions to the country of Haiti.

  • DOCUMENT - International Code of Marketing

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The learner will be able to: Describe three events leading up to the Code; Explain the aim of the Code; Explain the products covered under the Code; Recognize potential conflicts of interest in the health care system with regard to the Code; List three potential violations of the Code. Credit: 3 E CERPs and 3 Contact Hours

    Source: Code Essentials 3: Responsibilities of Health Workers under the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes and subsequent WHA resolutions, International Baby Food Action Network (IBFAN), 2009

    The learner will be able to:

    • Describe three events leading up to the Code.
    • Explain the aim of the Code.
    • Explain the products covered under the Code.
    • Recognize potential conflicts of interest in the health care system with regard to the Code.
    • List three potential violations of the Code.

    There are 50 multiple choice questions.

    You will have two attempts to achieve a passing score of 70% on this module.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

  • WEBINAR - Case Studies on the Referral of Infants for Bodywork: Clinical Signs and Lactation Outcomes

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/01/2018

    The concept of bodywork for infants with breastfeeding difficulties is still new (especially outside of the USA) and there is not much published evidence to support it. However, clinical experience seems to suggest that bodywork is a useful tool to help some infants. Through the presentation of case studies, this webinar shares clinical experience related to common questions asked by lactation specialists: When might bodywork help a baby? To whom can I refer the infant? What might the results be? Credit: 1.5 L CERPs and 1.5 Contact Hours

    Case Studies on the Referral of Infants for Bodywork: Clinical Signs and Lactation Outcomes

    The concept of bodywork for infants with breastfeeding difficulties is still new (especially outside of the USA) and there is not much published evidence to support it. However, clinical experience seems to suggest that bodywork is a useful tool to help some infants. Through the presentation of case studies, this webinar shares clinical experience related to common questions asked by lactation specialists: When might bodywork help a baby? To whom can I refer the infant? What might the results be?

    Credit: 1.5 L CERPs and 1.5 Contact Hours

    Source: ILCA Webinar 1 March 2018

    Presented by: Carmela (Kika) Baeza, MD, IBCLC

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • List signs of infant sucking difficulties.
    • Describe markers that suggest an infant´s breastfeeding/chestfeeding difficulties may benefit from bodywork.
    • Explain how to develop a local referral network of bodywork professionals.

    Learning Level: Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Carmela Baeza

    MD, IBCLC

    Carmela Baeza, MD, IBCLC, RLC, is a physician and lactation consultant, specialized in family medicine and in sexual therapy in Madrid, Spain. She has a Bachelor´s degree in Public Health Education. She became an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) in 2005 and was a member of ILCA a year before that. She has been a Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative Evaluator since 2006. She works in a private family wellness clinic, Raices, where she is in charge of the lactation program. She also teaches natural family planning (Symptothermal Method and Lactational Amenorrhea Method) and is the current president of the Asociación Española de Consultoras Certificadas en Lactancia Materna (Spanish Lactation Consultant Association). Over the past seven years she has coordinated more than 40 breastfeeding courses in which the educational team she directs—comprised of four IBCLCs, two nurses, a pediatrician, and a midwife—has trained over three thousand doctors, midwives, and nurses from both the Spanish National Health Service and the private sector in Spain.

  • CONF 2016 Growth Charts: Use and Misuse

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In this session, Dr. Gonzalez reviews the correct way to use growth charts to determine growth in nurslings. Through several case studies, he illustrates normal growth and development, how normal growth and development vary significantly, and how the misuse of growth charts can lead to babies being labeled as having problems when they are not at all having problems. Dr. Gonzalez is both knowledgeable about the subject matter and entertaining in its presentation. Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Growth Charts: Use and Misuse

    In this session, Dr. Gonzalez reviews the correct way to use growth charts to determine growth in nurslings. Through several case studies, he illustrates normal growth and development, how normal growth and development vary significantly, and how the misuse of growth charts can lead to babies being labeled as having problems when they are not at all having problems. Dr. Gonzalez is both knowledgeable about the subject matter and entertaining in its presentation.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference 2016

    Presented by: Carlos González, MD

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Explain how to assess weight and height using growth charts
    • Describe the variability of normal human growth
    • Discuss how growth assessment can do harm

    Learning Level: All

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Carlos González

    MD

    Dr. Carlos González is an international speaker, author, and pediatrician in private practice. He has lectured at breastfeeding conferences, seminars, and courses throughout Europe and the Americas. He has a long history of engaging in breastfeeding promotion, including serving as a member of the International Baby Food Action Network (IBFAN) since 1986 and as the founder and president of the Catalan Breastfeeding Association since 1991. He has written numerous books and other publications about breastfeeding, which have been translated from Spanish into German, Italian, English, Japanese, Catalan, French, Turkish, Polish, Serbian, and Russian. He has translated several breastfeeding publications into Catalan and Spanish. He is the father of three breastfed children.

  • CONF 2016 Skin to Skin Care Decreases Procedural Pain for Newborns

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In this compelling session, the speakers identify the negative consequences of newborn exposure to numerous painful procedures after delivery and discuss how parent-provided skin-to-skin care can decrease procedural pain in newborns no matter how they are fed. They present the results of the pilot study they conducted at a Baby Friendly designated hospital in the United States. The session describes how they used a PICO question (Problem or Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcomes) to encourage their facility to question its current practices, examine the evidence, and change to engaging in evidence-based practice to reduce newborn pain. The PICO question was “For newborns born at more than 37 weeks gestation, does the use of skin-to-skin care reduce procedural pain?” The study showed a significant reduction of procedural pain in newborns receiving skin-to-skin care. Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Skin to Skin Care Decreases Procedural Pain for Newborns

    In this compelling session, the speakers identify the negative consequences of newborn exposure to numerous painful procedures after delivery and discuss how parent-provided skin-to-skin care can decrease procedural pain in newborns no matter how they are fed. They present the results of the pilot study they conducted at a Baby Friendly designated hospital in the United States. The session describes how they used a PICO question (Problem or Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcomes) to encourage their facility to question its current practices, examine the evidence, and change to engaging in evidence-based practice to reduce newborn pain. The PICO question was “For newborns born at more than 37 weeks gestation, does the use of skin-to-skin care reduce procedural pain?” The study showed a significant reduction of procedural pain in newborns receiving skin-to-skin care.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference 2016

    Presented by: Rebecca Law, RN, MA, IBCLC, ANLC and Kimberly Williams, RNC-MNN, BSN

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • List two negative consequences of newborn exposure to numerous painful procedures
    • Explain how to use skin-to-skin care to decrease procedural pain in newborns
    • Describe the outcome of a pilot study showing significant reduction of procedural pain in newborns receiving skin-to-skin care

    Learning Level: Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Rebecca Law

    RN, MA, IBCLC, ANLC

    Kimberly Williams

    RNC-MNN, BSN

    Kim Williams, RNC, BSN, is the mother-baby nurse manager of the Maternal Newborn Postpartum Unit at the Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital in downtown, Fort Worth, Texas United States. She has the passion to improve outcome for postpartum mothers and their newborns. As an advocate for skin-to-skin care, she and her team implemented skin-to-skin care as a best practice to decrease newborn procedural pain. She has serve as the manager for her unit for 10 years. She has been committed to Texas Health Resources for over 18 years. Their woman's service department has been re-designated as a Baby Friendly Hospital. They have won the local recognition of "The Best Place to Have a Baby" for 19 years.

  • CONF 2016 The Affective Needs of Children: Crying and the Need for Comforting

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In this humorous but evidence-based session, Dr. Carlos González, offers a delightful, basic review of why human infants need to be near their mothers/caregivers, and why carrying and keeping infants near, even during sleep, is a developmentally appropriate response to the innate proximity-seeking behaviors exhibited by all infants. He explains from a biological and anthropological perspective why infant separation is not normal for human survival. In the words of the speaker, “Children all over the world, just like the offspring of many other species, want to be with their mothers all day (and night) long, want to be carried, and cry when separated from their mothers. But, many people in our western industrialized culture see that as abnormal. Our children are not our enemies. They want to be with us, because they love us. A lot.” Credit: 1 R CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    The Affective Needs of Children: Crying and the Need for Comforting

    In this humorous but evidence-based session, Dr. Carlos González, offers a delightful, basic review of why human infants need to be near their mothers/caregivers, and why carrying and keeping infants near, even during sleep, is a developmentally appropriate response to the innate proximity-seeking behaviors exhibited by all infants. He explains from a biological and anthropological perspective why infant separation is not normal for human survival. In the words of the speaker, “Children all over the world, just like the offspring of many other species, want to be with their mothers all day (and night) long, want to be carried, and cry when separated from their mothers. But, many people in our western industrialized culture see that as abnormal. Our children are not our enemies. They want to be with us, because they love us. A lot.”

    Credit: 1 R CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference 2016

    Presented by: Carlos González, MD

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Describe why babies want to be carried
    • Explain why babies don’t want to sleep alone
    • Compare mother and infant behavior in different species and cultures

    Learning Level: Beginner/Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Carlos González

    MD

    Dr. Carlos González is an international speaker, author, and pediatrician in private practice. He has lectured at breastfeeding conferences, seminars, and courses throughout Europe and the Americas. He has a long history of engaging in breastfeeding promotion, including serving as a member of the International Baby Food Action Network (IBFAN) since 1986 and as the founder and president of the Catalan Breastfeeding Association since 1991. He has written numerous books and other publications about breastfeeding, which have been translated from Spanish into German, Italian, English, Japanese, Catalan, French, Turkish, Polish, Serbian, and Russian. He has translated several breastfeeding publications into Catalan and Spanish. He is the father of three breastfed children.

  • CONF 2016 Cooperative Infant Feeding in Humans: Biocultural Perspectives of Sharing Human Milk

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Dr. Palmquist reviews the origins of breastfeeding and human milk sharing through her unique perspective as an anthropologist. This session reviews information about alloparenting and allomaternal breastfeeding across many cultural contexts, as well as research into cultural norms and taboos. It helps learners understand the origins of human milk sharing and societal views of the practice today and deepens our understanding of the importance of human milk for all human infants. Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Cooperative Infant Feeding in Humans: Biocultural Perspectives of Sharing Human Milk

    Dr. Palmquist reviews the origins of breastfeeding and human milk sharing through her unique perspective as an anthropologist. This session reviews information about alloparenting and allomaternal breastfeeding across many cultural contexts, as well as research into cultural norms and taboos. It helps learners understand the origins of human milk sharing and societal views of the practice today and deepens our understanding of the importance of human milk for all human infants.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference 2016

    Presented by: Aunchalee Palmquist, PhD, IBCLC

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Describe human milk sharing practices across cultures and history
    • Explain the importance of cooperative infant caregiving in humans
    • Discuss the ways in which human milk sharing is related to global health

    Learning Level: Intermediate/Advanced

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Aunchalee Palmquist

    PhD, IBCLC

    Dr. Palmquist is Assistant Professor in the Dept. of Maternal and Child Health and the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. She is a medical anthropologist and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC). Dr. Palmquist has served as an International Lactation Consultants Association (ILCA) liaison to the United Nations advocating for global breastfeeding policy, and represents CGBI in the WHO/UNICEF Global Breastfeeding Collective. Her recent research focuses on critical biocultural contexts of breastfeeding and human lactation, global maternal-child health disparities, human milk sharing and milk banking, and infant and young child feeding in emergencies. She has led workshops on cultural humility for health care professionals and has over 20 years of experience working in community-based settings, on topics ranging from indigenous, immigrant, and refugee health, marine resource management, HIV/AIDS, addiction and substance use, breast cancer, and maternal and child health.