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  • CONF 2018 Gender and Queer Communities 101: Building a Foundation for Culturally Humble and Inclusive Care

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 07/19/2018

    This session is an introduction to LGBTQIA+ identities and communities. We will define key terms and concepts including sex, gender, intersex, gender expression, transgender, transsexual, gender identity, and intersectionality. The basic do’s and don’ts of respectful language and writing will be covered. We will also consider the question of how LGBTQIA+ communities relate to and intersect with other marginalized communities, inclusive of international contexts. Awareness of this essential background information will help lactation professionals in providing culturally competent and inclusive care for LGBTQIA+ patients and clients.

    Gender and Queer Communities 101: Building a Foundation for Culturally Humble and Inclusive Care

    This session is an introduction to LGBTQIA+ identities and communities. We will define key terms and concepts including sex, gender, intersex, gender expression, transgender, transsexual, gender identity, and intersectionality. The basic do’s and don’ts of respectful language and writing will be covered. We will also consider the question of how LGBTQIA+ communities relate to and intersect with other marginalized communities, inclusive of international contexts. Awareness of this essential background information will help lactation professionals in providing culturally competent and inclusive care for LGBTQIA+ patients and clients.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2018 - Portland, Oregon, USA

    Presented by: Trevor MacDonald

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Define key terms important to LGBTQIA+ communities.
    • Identify respectful language as well as language to avoid when discussing LGBTQIA+ issues.
    • Identify ways that other communities intersect with LGBTQIA+ identities.

    Learning Level: All

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has received support from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and Innovation. Funding #134042.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Trevor MacDonald

    Trevor MacDonald is a transgender man from Manitoba, Canada who birthed both his children at home, nursed his first child, and now nurses his second child. In 2011, he began a blog, milkjunkies.net, which is popular with both transgender individuals and healthcare providers looking for information on transgender reproduction and infant feeding. He recently led a University of Ottawa study, funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, that explored the experiences of transmasculine individuals with pregnancy, birth, and infant feeding. Trevor is the first openly transgender person to become a La Leche League Leader, and he is the author of Where's the Mother? Stories from a Transgender Dad.

  • CONF 2018 Length of Stay and Breastfeeding Status Associated with Type of Milk Supplementation Among Late Preterm Infants in a Mother/Baby Unit: Results of a Retrospective Chart Review

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 07/19/2018

    Background: To assess whether type of milk supplementation provided to breastfeeding late preterm infants (LPIs) is associated with length of stay (LOS) in the hospital or breastfeeding status at discharge. Methods: Retrospective chart review at a tertiary care teaching hospital in the southern United States. Participants were late preterm infants 350/7-36 6/7 weeks gestational age (N=183) admitted to the mother-baby unit between November 1, 2014 and October 31, 2016. The exposure of interest was type of milk supplementation, e.g., expressed human milk (EHM), pasteurized donor human milk (PDHM), and formula.Outcomes measured were LOS and breastfeeding status at discharge. Generalized Poisson regression models were used to compare LOS by type of milk supplementation. Modified Poisson regression models were used to estimate risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals for associations with breastfeeding status at discharge. Results: The LOS for breastfed infants supplemented with EHM and/or PDHM did not differ significantly from exclusively breastfed infants who received no supplement. Exclusively formula fed infants had a longer LOS of 3.2 days compared to 2.6 days for exclusively breastfed infants (p=0.001). Breastfed infants receiving any formula supplementation were 16% less likely to continue breastfeeding until day of discharge compared to breastfed infants receiving human milk supplementation (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.77-0.92).Conclusion: The high prevalence of supplementation among breastfeeding LPIs underscores the potential impact of type of milk supplementation on LOS and breastfeeding outcomes. Our findings suggest that human milk supplementation discourages transition to formula feeding before hospital discharge without increasing LOS.

    Length of Stay and Breastfeeding Status Associated with Type of Milk Supplementation Among Late Preterm Infants in a Mother/Baby Unit: Results of a Retrospective Chart Review

    Background: To assess whether type of milk supplementation provided to breastfeeding late preterm infants (LPIs) is associated with length of stay (LOS) in the hospital or breastfeeding status at discharge. Methods: Retrospective chart review at a tertiary care teaching hospital in the southern United States. Participants were late preterm infants 350/7-36 6/7 weeks gestational age (N=183) admitted to the mother-baby unit between November 1, 2014 and October 31, 2016. The exposure of interest was type of milk supplementation, e.g., expressed human milk (EHM), pasteurized donor human milk (PDHM), and formula.Outcomes measured were LOS and breastfeeding status at discharge. Generalized Poisson regression models were used to compare LOS by type of milk supplementation. Modified Poisson regression models were used to estimate risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals for associations with breastfeeding status at discharge.   Results: The LOS for breastfed infants supplemented with EHM and/or PDHM did not differ significantly from exclusively breastfed infants who received no supplement.  Exclusively formula fed infants had a longer LOS of 3.2 days compared to 2.6 days for exclusively breastfed infants (p=0.001).   Breastfed infants receiving any formula supplementation were 16% less likely to continue breastfeeding until day of discharge compared to breastfed infants receiving human milk supplementation (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.77-0.92).Conclusion: The high prevalence of supplementation among breastfeeding LPIs underscores the potential impact of type of milk supplementation on LOS and breastfeeding outcomes.  Our findings suggest that human milk supplementation discourages transition to formula feeding before hospital discharge without increasing LOS.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2018 - Portland, Oregon, USA

    Presented by: Rebecca Mannel BS, IBCLC, CPH; Jennifer Peck PhD

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Discuss the impact of human milk feedings on growth and development of late preterm infants.
    • Identify barriers to exclusive human milk feedings for late preterm infants on a mother/baby unit.
    • Compare impact of formula vs human milk supplementation of late preterm infants on length of stay and breastfeeding continuation.

    Learning Level: Intermediate-Advanced

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below. 

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Becky Mannel

    BS, IBCLC, FILCA

    Becky Mannel is the Director of the Oklahoma Breastfeeding Resource Center in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center and the Executive Director for the Oklahoma Mothers’ Milk Bank in the United States. She leads the Becoming Baby-Friendly in Oklahoma project sponsored by the Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH). Becky also developed and oversees the Oklahoma Breastfeeding Hotline and provides professional training/education to all Oklahoma hospitals to improve their breastfeeding care and outcomes--both OSDH-funded projects. She represents the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners on the US Breastfeeding Committee and has served twice as Lead Editor for the International Lactation Consultant Association textbook, Core Curriculum for Lactation Consultant Practice. She is past Chair of the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE) and past President of the International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA).

    Jennifer Peck

    PhD

    Dr. Peck is a Professor of Epidemiology at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (OUHSC), College of Public Health and Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, College of Medicine. She has 15 years of experience conducting clinical and population-based research in the area of reproductive, perinatal and pediatric epidemiology. In addition, Dr. Peck teaches masters and doctoral-level courses in epidemiologic methods and reproductive and perinatal epidemiology. She has also served on several National Institutes of Health and international review panels and contributed epidemiologic expertise to national committees including the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Scientific Advisory Board for the review of a perchlorate maximum contaminant level goal as it pertains to maternal and child health, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Board on the Health of Select Populations, and the IOM Committee on Gulf War and Health reviewing the reproductive health effects of Gulf War service.

  • CONF 2018 Using the Hazelbaker Assessment Tool for Lingual Frenulum Function: Guidance for Clinical Settings

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 07/19/2018

    Dr. Hazelbaker is responsible for developing some and formalizing and codifying all of the diagnostic criteria for tongue-tie in infants. These diagnostic criteria were then combined to form a screening tool for the condition known as the Assessment Tool for Lingual Frenulum Function©™ (ATLFF©™). Her research on assessment and screening for tongue-tie has set a worldwide standard and forms the basis for many of the other proposed and yet-to-be researched assessment processes. The ATLFF©™ remains the only valid and reliable tongue-tie screening and assessment tool for infants under 6 months of age regardless of feeding method. In this presentation, Dr. Hazelbaker uses multiple video segments to illustrate the proper use of the ATLFF©™. Participants come away with a better understanding of the ATLFF©™ and its application in clinical settings.

    Using the Hazelbaker Assessment Tool for Lingual Frenulum Function: Guidance for Clinical Settings

    Dr. Hazelbaker is responsible for developing some and formalizing and codifying all of the diagnostic criteria for tongue-tie in infants. These diagnostic criteria were then combined to form a screening tool for the condition known as the Assessment Tool for Lingual Frenulum Function©™ (ATLFF©™). Her research on assessment and screening for tongue-tie has set a worldwide standard and forms the basis for many of the other proposed and yet-to-be researched assessment processes. The ATLFF©™  remains the only valid and reliable tongue-tie screening and assessment tool for infants under 6 months of age regardless of feeding method. In this presentation, Dr. Hazelbaker uses multiple video segments to illustrate the proper use of the ATLFF©™. Participants come away with a better understanding of the ATLFF©™  and its application in clinical settings.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2018 - Portland, Oregon, USA

    Presented by: Alison Hazelbaker PhD, IBCLC, FILCA

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Describe the difference between classification tools, assessment tools and screening tools.
    • Discuss the seven function items on the ATLFF and how to properly screen using them.
    • Discuss the five appearance items on the ATLFF and how to properly screen with them.

    Learning Level: Beginner-Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below. 

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Alison Hazelbaker

    PhD, IBCLC, FILCA

    Dr. Alison Hazelbaker has been in private practice for over 30 years. She specializes in resolving infant sucking problems caused by a variety of factors including structural and psycho-emotional etiologies. She combines multiple modalities in her quest for superior breastfeeding outcomes with this group of otherwise neurotypical infants. She uses craniosacral therapy, trauma resolution and reflex activation therapies and garners a near 100% resolution rate. Dr. Hazelbaker speaks around the world about structurally-related sucking problems, their assessment and treatment. She is author of the Assessment Tool for Lingual Frenulum Function and two books on infant tongue-tie. She recently joined the team at Union Institute and University's lactation training program as an adjunct professor of clinical studies. She has five breastfed children who are now proud parents of her eight grandchildren.

  • CONF 2018 Preparing IBLCE Exam Candidates for Success: Lessons Learned From the First CAAHEP-Accredited Pathway 2 Program

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 07/19/2018

    The Mary Rose Tully Training Initiative (MRT-TI) of the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute (CGBI) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the first CAAHEP-accredited Pathway 2 lactation training program. Since its inception in August 2009, MRT-TI has graduated an annual cohort of candidates prepared to sit for the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners board certification exam. We conducted an alumni survey of MRT-TI graduates to assess how prepared they were to pass this exam and enter the workforce by collecting data on their professional progress since completing the program. We disseminated an electronic survey via social media and CGBI and MRT-TI listservs to reach all alumni who have graduated from the yearlong training program. Anonymous zip codes were also collected from survey respondents to map the distribution of alumni across North Carolina. These maps can be used to identify geographic variations in the concentration of both practicing and non-practicing IBCLCs across the state and their relationship to clinical site and maternity center locations. The results from this survey will characterize the career trajectories of MRT-TI alumni and the role of the training program in supporting their professional development. Additionally, lessons learned from our survey can be used to support new Pathway 2 programs in their development to replicate and enhance this model program.

    Preparing IBLCE Exam Candidates for Success: Lessons Learned From the First CAAHEP-Accredited Pathway 2 Program

    The Mary Rose Tully Training Initiative (MRT-TI) of the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute (CGBI) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the first CAAHEP-accredited Pathway 2 lactation training program. Since its inception in August 2009, MRT-TI has graduated an annual cohort of candidates prepared to sit for the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners board certification exam. We conducted an alumni survey of MRT-TI graduates to assess how prepared they were to pass this exam and enter the workforce by collecting data on their professional progress since completing the program. We disseminated an electronic survey via social media and CGBI and MRT-TI listservs to reach all alumni who have graduated from the yearlong training program. Anonymous zip codes were also collected from survey respondents to map the distribution of alumni across North Carolina. These maps can be used to identify geographic variations in the concentration of both practicing and non-practicing IBCLCs across the state and their relationship to clinical site and maternity center locations. The results from this survey will characterize the career trajectories of MRT-TI alumni and the role of the training program in supporting their professional development. Additionally, lessons learned from our survey can be used to support new Pathway 2 programs in their development to replicate and enhance this model program.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2018 - Portland, Oregon, USA

    Presented by: Kathryn Wouk MS, IBCLC; Catherine Sullivan MPH, RD, IBCLC

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Characterize the workforce trajectories of Pathway 2-trained alumni.
    • Integrate lessons learned from MRT-TI alumni to support future Pathway 2 programs in their development.

    Learning Level: Intermediate-Advanced

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below. 

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Catherine Sullivan

    MPH, RD, LDN, IBCLC, RLC, FAND

    Catherine Sullivan, MPH, RD, LDN, IBCLC, FAND is Director of the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute and an assistant professor in the Department of Maternal and Child Health at the Gillings School of Public Health, University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill in the United States. Catherine received her BS in Dietetics from East Carolina University and her MPH in Nutrition from UNC. She is a registered/licensed dietitian and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant with over 20 years of public health nutrition and breastfeeding experience. Catherine serves as course coordinator for the Mary Rose Tully Training Initiative, a CAAHEP/LEAARC accredited pathway 2 lactation training program, and serves on the core leadership team of the Centers for Disease Control's EMPower Breastfeeding and EMPower Training Initiatives. She is the principal investigator for ENRICH Carolinas and the RISE: Lactation Training Model (Reclaiming, Improving, and Sustaining Equity). Catherine is an Elected Director to the US Breastfeeding Committee, Co-Chair of the North Carolina Lactation Consultant Association and Past Chair of the Women’s Health Dietetic Practice Group for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Catherine is a frequent speaker at national and statewide conferences, with over 100 presentations. In 2017, she was inducted as a Fellow by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. She lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina with her husband, Fred, and her 9-year old son, Finnegan. Finn happily breastfed for the first 31 months of life.

    Kathryn Wouk

    MS, IBCLC

    Kathryn Wouk is a PhD candidate in the Maternal and Child Health Department of the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  She is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant and works as a Graduate Research Assistant with the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute. Under the mentorship of Dr. Alison Stuebe, she studies breastfeeding and maternal mental health and is particularly interested in women’s emotional experience of infant feeding. She currently serves on the board of the North Carolina Breastfeeding Coalition and the Global Health Foundation.

  • CONF 2018 Lactation Support in Disasters and Emergencies: Integrating Life Course, Psychosocial, and Human Rights Perspectives

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 07/19/2018

    In emergencies, women and children are among the most vulnerable to multiple forms of violence and exploitation as well as illness and death. Displacement resulting from natural disasters and complex humanitarian crises has a profound impact on health during the perinatal period, with significant consequences that reverberate across the life course. The literature reveals that emergencies disproportionately affect women’s and girls’ access to medical, social, cultural, and familial support systems. Barriers to perinatal and psychosocial care are associated with increased rates of morbidity and mortality among mothers/birthing parents and infants. Poorly coordinated and inappropriate emergency response (e.g., mass formula distribution), exacerbate the negative impact of emergencies on maternal-child perinatal health. In this presentation, the significance of skilled lactation support in emergencies will be discussed in the context of the reproductive health continuum. Special emphasis will be placed on the integration of psychosocial and lactation support in complex humanitarian settings.

    Lactation Support in Disasters and Emergencies: Integrating Life Course, Psychosocial, and Human Rights Perspectives

    In emergencies, women and children are among the most vulnerable to multiple forms of violence and exploitation as well as illness and death. Displacement resulting from natural disasters and complex humanitarian crises has a profound impact on health during the perinatal period, with significant consequences that reverberate across the life course. The literature reveals that emergencies disproportionately affect women’s and girls’ access to medical, social, cultural, and familial support systems. Barriers to perinatal and psychosocial care are associated with increased rates of morbidity and mortality among mothers/birthing parents and infants. Poorly coordinated and inappropriate emergency response (e.g., mass formula distribution), exacerbate the negative impact of emergencies on maternal-child perinatal health. In this presentation, the significance of skilled lactation support in emergencies will be discussed in the context of the reproductive health continuum. Special emphasis will be placed on the integration of psychosocial and lactation support in complex humanitarian settings.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2018 - Portland, Oregon, USA

    Presented by: Aunchalee Loscalzo Palmquist PhD, IBCLC

    • Describe various factors that shape global perinatal health disparities within the natal dyad.
    • Describe emergency response practices that (i) reproduce health inequalities and (ii) support resilience to health inequalities.
    • Use examples to illustrate the importance of integrated psychosocial and lactation support in reducing short- and long-term negative health consequences across the life course.

    Learning Level: All

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has disclosed having received competitive funds. 

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Aunchalee Palmquist

    PhD, IBCLC

    Dr. Palmquist is Assistant Professor in the Dept. of Maternal and Child Health and the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. She is a medical anthropologist and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC). Dr. Palmquist has served as an International Lactation Consultants Association (ILCA) liaison to the United Nations advocating for global breastfeeding policy, and represents CGBI in the WHO/UNICEF Global Breastfeeding Collective. Her recent research focuses on critical biocultural contexts of breastfeeding and human lactation, global maternal-child health disparities, human milk sharing and milk banking, and infant and young child feeding in emergencies. She has led workshops on cultural humility for health care professionals and has over 20 years of experience working in community-based settings, on topics ranging from indigenous, immigrant, and refugee health, marine resource management, HIV/AIDS, addiction and substance use, breast cancer, and maternal and child health.

  • CONF 2018 The Return of Breastsleeping: Humankind’s Oldest and Most Successful Sleep and Feeding Arrangement

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 07/19/2018

    To introduce and justify a new conceptual epidemiological category, breastsleeping, that makes distinctions physiologically and behaviorally between the breastfeeding-bedsharing mother-baby dyad and the bottle or formula-fed bed-sharing dyad. We argue that breastsleeping is an evolved integrated system in which maternal sleep, infant sleep, and breastfeeding patterns can be explained. We argue that breastsleeping behavior deserves to be recognized as legitimate and acceptably safe for bedsharing when practiced (as its definition suggests) in the absence of all known hazardous factors. This argument reflects the full application of evidence based medicine, unlike the AAP's recommendation against bedsharing under any circumstances which violates the most important evidence based medicine requirement like respecting patient values, and generating hypothesis for testing epidemiological findings before moving to sweeping public health recommendations. Parental biology including hormonal profiles of mothers and fathers and characteristic reflexes of the human infant are used to explain the powerful underlying motives and emotions felt by infants and parents alike that explain why breastsleeping will not be eradicated.

    The Return of Breastsleeping: Humankind's Oldest and Most Successful Sleep and Feeding Arrangement

    To introduce and justify a new conceptual epidemiological category, breastsleeping, that makes distinctions physiologically and behaviorally between the breastfeeding-bedsharing mother-baby dyad and the bottle or formula-fed bed-sharing dyad. We argue that breastsleeping is an evolved integrated system in which maternal sleep, infant sleep, and breastfeeding patterns can be explained. We argue that breastsleeping behavior deserves to be recognized as legitimate and acceptably safe for bedsharing when practiced (as its definition suggests) in the absence of all known hazardous factors. This argument reflects the full application of evidence based medicine, unlike the AAP's recommendation against bedsharing under any circumstances which violates the most important evidence based medicine requirement like respecting patient values, and generating hypothesis for testing epidemiological findings before moving to sweeping public health recommendations. Parental biology including hormonal profiles of mothers and fathers and characteristic reflexes of the human infant are used to explain the powerful underlying motives and emotions felt by infants and parents alike that explain why breastsleeping will not be eradicated.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2018 - Portland, Oregon, USA

    Presented by: James McKenna PhD

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Learners will be able to understand what breastsleeping is and how and why millions of mothers breastsleep i.e. sleep next to their infants (either on the same or a different surface) to breastfeed, absent of hazardous factors despite medical authoritative attempts to eradicate it.
    • Learners will know how the biology underlying the parental response to infants make it predictable that especially breastfeeding mothers will instinctly reach for their infants in the middle of the night, and why infants are so hard to resist, which is due in part to biological cues given by infants biologically processed by adult receptor cells specifically designed to respond to those same infantile signals.
    • a) Learners will know how and why AAP based infant sleep recommendations do not conform to, nor do they reflect evidence based medicine principles, as is claimed by the AAP. b) Learners will know how breastsleeping (bedsharing with breastfeeding in the absence of hazardous factors) differs behaviorally  and physiologically from bottle or formula feeding bedsharing, thus making it acceptably safe. c) Learners will know the ethical challenges health professionals and especially lactation counselors face by being told they will be fired from their professional positions if they share what they know with their clients and patients about safer cosleeping in the form of breastsleeping or any kind of bedsharing.

    Learning Level: All

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below. 

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    James McKenna

    PhD

    James McKenna pioneered the first behavioral and electro-physiological studies documenting differences between mothers and infants sleeping together and apart and has become known worldwide for his work in promoting studies of breastfeeding and mother-infant cosleeping. He is a biological anthropologist and Director of the Mother-Baby Behavioral Sleep Laboratory at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana, United States. He began his career studying the social behavior and development of monkeys and apes with an emphasis on parenting behavior and ecology. He has published over 150 articles and six books, including a popular parenting book Sleeping With Your Baby: A Parent’s Guide To Co-sleeping. He has co-edited Ancestral Landscapes In Human Evolution, Evolutionary Medicine, and a more recent co-edited volume Evolution and Health: New Perspectives. He won the prestigious Shannon Award (with Dr. Sarah Mosko) from the National Institutes of Child Health and Development for his Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) research and is the United State's foremost authority and spokesperson to the national press on issues pertaining to infant and childhood sleep problems, sleep development, and breastfeeding. Most recently, Dr. McKenna has published a new paper with Lee Gettler proposing a new concept, breastsleeping, to promote the idea that 1) breastfeeding-bedsharing infants are acceptably safe compared with bottle-feeding or formula-feeding infants, and 2) breastsleeping is part of the same inextricable, adaptive system that makes studying normal healthy infant sleep, maternal sleep, or normal breastfeeding patterns separate from each other inaccurate and/or invalid.

  • CONF 2018 SIDS and Colic: Do They Share the Same Breathing Control System Origin?

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 07/19/2018

    We here present a new set of hypotheses proposing that inconsolable crying and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), seemingly remarkably different outcomes may stem from the same human biological vulnerability characteristic not identified in other species. A model stresses the development over the 2-7 month of life of shared control of breathing made possible by the gradual integration of learned, volatile control of breathing underlying vocalizations (based on higher cortex nuclei) with involuntary or tidal breathing (based on chemoreceptor or brainstem nuclei), a system of respiratory control required for language, specifically speech breathing. It is proposed that because of this adaption infants could be subject to two different neurological glitches: SIDS reflects a missed signal as when infants transition between REM and NREM sleep while dreaming. That is, during REM sleep infants willfully participate in their breathing but during transitions either into REM or out of it the signal from one to the other control system is inadequate or missed altogether. As regards to colic, it is proposed that infants can initiate a cry and the voluntary breath required to sustain it but cannot stop it as both voice and breath become locked together with both systems excitatory neurons firing at the same time. Upon realizing that it cannot stop crying, in fear, the infant does more or what it is trying to reverse, to cry.

    SIDS and Colic: Do They Share the Same Breathing Control System Origin?

    We here present a new set of hypotheses proposing that inconsolable crying and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), seemingly remarkably different outcomes may stem from the same human biological vulnerability characteristic not identified in other species. A model stresses the development over the 2-7 month of life of shared control of breathing made possible by the gradual integration of learned, volatile control of breathing underlying vocalizations (based on higher cortex nuclei) with involuntary or tidal breathing (based on chemoreceptor or brainstem nuclei), a system of respiratory control required for language, specifically speech breathing. It is proposed that because of this adaption infants could be subject to two different neurological glitches: SIDS reflects a missed signal as when infants transition between REM and NREM sleep while dreaming. That is, during REM sleep infants willfully participate in their breathing but during transitions either into REM or out of it the signal from one to the other control system is inadequate or missed altogether.  As regards to colic, it is proposed that infants can initiate a cry and the voluntary breath required to sustain it but cannot stop it as both voice and breath become locked together with both systems excitatory neurons firing at the same time. Upon realizing that it cannot stop crying, in fear, the infant does more or what it is trying to reverse, to cry.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2018 - Portland, Oregon, USA

    Presented by: James McKenna PhD

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • The learner will be able to understand the neurobiology that makes human breathing control species-specific, unique (necessary for language) and why we posit the testable hypothesis that the SIDS-Colic neurological control glitches possibly reflect a lack of developmental synchrony, between stop-go crying activities, as regards to colic (infant can begin a cry but not reverse it), and transitions between Rem-NEM during sleep (where infants go in and out of purposeful control of breathing while they dream) as regards SIDS. We hypothesize that there is a missing or inefficient signal to permit the infant to willfully break the apnea by cortical intervention. In each of these scenarios we are positioning a mis-communication or missed signal or between cortical or subcortical neural tracts creating adaptive failures exacerbated by prolonged parent-infant separation, whether night or day. This would be due to one or the other subsystem of neural networks and/or their functioning nuclei not being equally mature or able to sufficiently send, detect, or respond, to signals occurring between the subsystems, particularly in regards to SIDS, while asleep, and colic, while awake.
    • Learner will be taught exactly how and in what ways, breastsleeping and the benefits conferred as infants experience the sensory changes that comprise it and are predicted to serve to accelerate the maturity and/or full integration of the voluntary with involuntary respiratory sub-systems in general, and at very least provide alternative sensory neuro-pathways (back-ups) potentially helping to buffer human infants through this very narrow period of less stable breathing as infants transition to ultimately a more versatile form of breathing control necessary for speech.
    • Learner will know that SIDS and colic peak at the same time and that beginning around one month, during sleep and awake periods, infants gradually learn to shift between volitional (voluntary) and automatic (involuntary) breathing and voice control. This is based on developing functional interconnections between cortical (higher brain) and lower sub-cortical neural (respiratory) networks. The existence of sudden infant death syndrome and inconsolable crying may reflect adaptive failures due to this unique human respiratory system necessary for speech exacerbated by prolonged parent-infant separation, whether night or day, due to one or the other subsystem of neural networks and/or their functioning nuclei not being equally mature or able to sufficiently send, detect, or respond to signals occurring between these sub-systems, particularly in regards to SIDS, the cortex is not alerted to awaken the infant so that it can willfully and with purpose, terminate the apnea by breathing.

    Learning Level: All

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below. 

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    James McKenna

    PhD

    James McKenna pioneered the first behavioral and electro-physiological studies documenting differences between mothers and infants sleeping together and apart and has become known worldwide for his work in promoting studies of breastfeeding and mother-infant cosleeping. He is a biological anthropologist and Director of the Mother-Baby Behavioral Sleep Laboratory at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana, United States. He began his career studying the social behavior and development of monkeys and apes with an emphasis on parenting behavior and ecology. He has published over 150 articles and six books, including a popular parenting book Sleeping With Your Baby: A Parent’s Guide To Co-sleeping. He has co-edited Ancestral Landscapes In Human Evolution, Evolutionary Medicine, and a more recent co-edited volume Evolution and Health: New Perspectives. He won the prestigious Shannon Award (with Dr. Sarah Mosko) from the National Institutes of Child Health and Development for his Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) research and is the United State's foremost authority and spokesperson to the national press on issues pertaining to infant and childhood sleep problems, sleep development, and breastfeeding. Most recently, Dr. McKenna has published a new paper with Lee Gettler proposing a new concept, breastsleeping, to promote the idea that 1) breastfeeding-bedsharing infants are acceptably safe compared with bottle-feeding or formula-feeding infants, and 2) breastsleeping is part of the same inextricable, adaptive system that makes studying normal healthy infant sleep, maternal sleep, or normal breastfeeding patterns separate from each other inaccurate and/or invalid.

  • WEBINAR - Nonprescription Drugs and Lactation: Helping Families Make Informed Decisions

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 05/14/2018

    The use of nonprescription products by breastfeeding mothers is even more common than the use of prescription drugs. Pharmacists, doctors, and lactation consultants must be able to provide proper advice on the use or safety of nonprescription products during breastfeeding. The presentation on breastfeeding and nonprescription drugs will provide the necessary information to do so. Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Nonprescription Drugs and Lactation: Helping Families Make Informed Decisions

    The use of nonprescription products by breastfeeding mothers is even more common than
    the use of prescription drugs.  Pharmacists, doctors, and lactation consultants must be able to provide proper advice on the use or safety of  nonprescription products during breastfeeding. The presentation on breastfeeding and nonprescription drugs will provide the necessary information to do so.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Webinar 14 May 2018

    Presented by: Frank J. Nice, RPh, DPA, CPHP

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Identify sources of  information for nonprescription medication use during breastfeeding
    • Utilize current concepts regarding the use of nonprescription medications during breastfeeding

    Learning Level: Beginner/Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Frank J. Nice

    RPh, DPA, CPHP

    Dr. Frank J. Nice has practiced as a consultant, lecturer, and author on medications and breastfeeding for over 40 years. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Pharmacy, a Masters Degree in Pharmacy Administration, Master’s and Doctorate Degrees in Public Administration, and Certification in Public Health Pharmacy. He retired after 43 years of government service, including 30 years of distinguished service with the US Public Health Service. He currently is self-employed as a consultant and President, Nice Breastfeeding LLC. Dr. Nice has published Nonprescription Drugs for the Breastfeeding Mother, The Galactogogue Recipe Book, and Recreational Drugs and Drugs Used To Treat Addicted Mothers: Impact on Pregnancy and Breastfeeding. Dr. Nice has also authored over four dozen peer-reviewed articles on the use of prescription medications, recreational drugs, Over-the-Counter (OTC) products, and herbals during breastfeeding. He has organized and participated in over 50 medical missions to the country of Haiti.

  • WEBINAR - Marijuana and Other Recreational Drugs During Pregnancy and Lactation: Recommendations, Assessment, Counseling, and Ethics

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered

    This session aims to improve pregnancy and breastfeeding outcomes by helping young women engage in good preventative health practices, including reducing use of cigarettes, alcohol, and illegal substances, including marijuana. After completing this module, participants will be able to help parents provide responsible and competent care for their children, and develop a vision and plan for future pregnancies and breastfeeding. Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Nonprescription Drugs and Lactation: Helping Families Make Informed Decisions

    This session aims to improve pregnancy and breastfeeding outcomes by helping young women engage in good preventative health practices, including reducing use of cigarettes, alcohol, and illegal substances, including marijuana.  After completing this module, participants will be able to help parents provide responsible and competent care for their children, and develop a vision and plan for future pregnancies and breastfeeding.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Webinar 14 May 2018

    Presented by: Frank J. Nice, RPh, DPA, CPHP

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Effectively evaluate recreational drug  use during breastfeeding and pregnancy
    • Counsel mothers who are pregnant or breastfeeding and using recreational drugs, including marijuana
    • Evaluate ethical concerns regarding marijuana use

    Learning Level: Beginner/Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Frank J. Nice

    RPh, DPA, CPHP

    Dr. Frank J. Nice has practiced as a consultant, lecturer, and author on medications and breastfeeding for over 40 years. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Pharmacy, a Masters Degree in Pharmacy Administration, Master’s and Doctorate Degrees in Public Administration, and Certification in Public Health Pharmacy. He retired after 43 years of government service, including 30 years of distinguished service with the US Public Health Service. He currently is self-employed as a consultant and President, Nice Breastfeeding LLC. Dr. Nice has published Nonprescription Drugs for the Breastfeeding Mother, The Galactogogue Recipe Book, and Recreational Drugs and Drugs Used To Treat Addicted Mothers: Impact on Pregnancy and Breastfeeding. Dr. Nice has also authored over four dozen peer-reviewed articles on the use of prescription medications, recreational drugs, Over-the-Counter (OTC) products, and herbals during breastfeeding. He has organized and participated in over 50 medical missions to the country of Haiti.

  • DOCUMENT - International Code of Marketing

    Contains 4 Component(s), 3 credits offered

    The learner will be able to: Describe three events leading up to the Code; Explain the aim of the Code; Explain the products covered under the Code; Recognize potential conflicts of interest in the health care system with regard to the Code; List three potential violations of the Code. Credit: 3 E CERPs and 3 Contact Hours

    Source: Code Essentials 3: Responsibilities of Health Workers under the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes and subsequent WHA resolutions, International Baby Food Action Network (IBFAN), 2009

    The learner will be able to:

    • Describe three events leading up to the Code.
    • Explain the aim of the Code.
    • Explain the products covered under the Code.
    • Recognize potential conflicts of interest in the health care system with regard to the Code.
    • List three potential violations of the Code.

    There are 50 multiple choice questions.

    You will have two attempts to achieve a passing score of 70% on this module.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."