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  • WEBINAR-The Maternal-Child Microbiome: An Overview of Evidence and Implications

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/04/2018

    The scientific world is exploding with excitement over the discovery of the microbiome. While it appears clear that suckling infant’s intestinal microbiome communicates with the mother’s lactocyte and perhaps beyond, little is known about the effects of this communication in practical terms. This presentation will review what is known and attempt to explain what it means, both now and in the future.

    The Maternal-Child Microbiome: An Overview of Evidence and Implications

    The scientific world is exploding with excitement over the discovery of the microbiome. While it appears clear that suckling infant’s intestinal microbiome communicates with the mother’s lactocyte and perhaps beyond, little is known about the effects of this communication in practical terms. This presentation will review what is known and attempt to explain what it means, both now and in the future.

    Credit: 1.25 L CERPs and 1.25 Contact Hours

    Source: ILCA Webinar 4 September 2018

    Presented by: Jarold T. Johnston Jr. MSN, CNM, IBCLC

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Identify the Maternal-Newborn Microbiome.
    • Discuss the value of the microbiome and its effect on wellness.
    • Identify implications of the microbiome and dysbiosis.

    Learning Level: Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Tom Johnston

    MSN, CNM, IBCLC

    Tom Johnston is unique as a midwife and lactation consultant and the father of eight breastfed children. Recently retired after 27 years in the US Army, he is now an Assistant Professor of Nursing at Methodist University where he teaches, among other things, Maternal-Child Nursing and Nutrition. You may have heard him at a number of conferences at the national level, to include the Association of Woman’s Health and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN), the International Lactation Consultant's Association (ILCA), or perhaps at dozens of other conferences across the country. In his written work he routinely addresses fatherhood and the role of the father in the breastfeeding relationship and has authored a chapter on the role of the father in breastfeeding for "Breastfeeding in Combat Boots: A survival guide to breastfeeding in the military".

  • CONF 2018 To Clip or Not to Clip? Clinical Dilemmas Regarding the Release of Posterior Tongue Tie and their Implications for Infant Feeding

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/20/2018

    A case for clipping, a case for waiting: Difficult decisions in clinic Background: As far as anterior tongue tie is concerned, there is a vast body of knowledge that has been validated. As for posterior tongue tie, the scientific evidence is lacking. Medical diagnoses are not part of the scope of practice of Lactation Consultants. Hence, there is a lot of confusion among professionals (both Drs and Lactation Consultants), resulting in over diagnosis and over treatment. Nonetheless, there is a lot of pressure on Lactation Consultants not to miss this diagnosis of tongue tie. Objective: To present a unique perspective of an experienced Lactation Consultant who is also experienced in diagnosing and treating various types of tongue ties. Methods: Clinical cases of babies with posterior tongue ties will be shown, including clinical photos. The presentation will focus on the clinical dilemmas regarding releasing posterior tongue ties and their implications for breastfeeding. Clinical Data and Statistics will be presented. Results: Exclusive breastfeeding was achieved in clinical cases with posterior tongue ties that where not released. Follow-ups will be shown. Conclusions: In some cases of posterior tongue ties, good breastfeeding counseling can make the action of releasing the tongue redundant.

    To Clip or Not to Clip? Clinical Dilemmas Regarding the Release of Posterior Tongue Tie and their Implications for Infant Feeding

    A case for clipping, a case for waiting: Difficult decisions in clinic Background:  As far as anterior tongue tie is concerned, there is a vast body of knowledge that has been validated. As for posterior tongue tie, the scientific evidence is lacking.  Medical diagnoses are not part of the scope of practice of Lactation Consultants. Hence, there is a lot of confusion among professionals (both Drs and Lactation Consultants), resulting in over diagnosis and over treatment. Nonetheless, there is a lot of pressure on Lactation Consultants not to miss this diagnosis of tongue tie. Objective:  To present a unique perspective of an experienced Lactation Consultant who is also experienced in diagnosing and treating various types of tongue ties. Methods: Clinical cases of babies with posterior tongue ties will be shown, including clinical photos. The presentation will focus on the clinical dilemmas regarding releasing posterior tongue ties and their implications for breastfeeding. Clinical Data and Statistics will be presented.   Results: Exclusive breastfeeding was achieved in clinical cases with posterior tongue ties that where not released. Follow-ups will be shown. Conclusions: In some cases of posterior tongue ties, good breastfeeding counseling can make the action of releasing the tongue redundant.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2018 - Portland, Oregon, USA

    Presented by: Gina Weissman DMD, RN, IBCLC

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Identify a key component of IBCLC’s role in promoting, supporting, and advocating for breastfeeding families using social-ecological theory and considering the social determinants of health.
    • List two ways to increase the visibility of their role in interdisciplinary practice within their context of practice.
    • Describe one way they can translate evidence-based practice into their community of practice with a goal of protecting breastfeeding.

    Learning Level: All

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below. 

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Gina Weissman

    DMD, RN, IBCLC

    Dr. Gina Weissman began her career as a dentist, receiving her D.M.D. at The Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School in Jerusalem.  Dr. Weissman has been working as an IBCLC since 1999 (recertified: 2004, 2009, 2014). She currently is also an RN nurse, and works in Laniado Maternity Hospital as a Lactation Consultant. Dr. Weissman mentors lactation students to the IBCLC certification via Pathway 1 and 3.

  • CONF 2018 Safe and Sustainable Implementation of BFHI's Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding: EMPower Breastfeeding and the New EMPower Training Initiative

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/20/2018

    Background: There has been a rapid increase in the number of maternity care facilities practicing the evidence-based care outlined in the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding (Ten Steps). Contributing to this increase are the state recognition programs for hospitals working on these best-practices, and the federally-funded projects helping facilities with technical assistance and training. With any rapid change effort, sustainability and safety are of utmost importance. With this in mind, the newly-funded EMPower Breastfeeding Training Initiative (EMPower BTI) focuses on safe implementation of the clinical practices contained within the Ten Steps. Aim/Purpose: This presentation will share the results and lessons learned from the EMPower Breastfeeding Initiative (EMPower), including cohort data on Baby-Friendly designation progress, breastfeeding rates and other clinical measures on front-line practices. (EMPower closes in April of 2018). In addition, the transition to EMPower BTI will be discussed as it relates to safe implementation of evidence-based maternity care practices supporting breastfeeding. (EMPower BTI begins September 2017, with recruitment in early 2018). Narrative: The Baby-friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) has proven effective at improving maternity care practices and increasing breastfeeding rates. Recent changes in the global BFHI guidelines have reconsidered and repackaged the Ten Steps and may signal a need for adapting ongoing efforts in the US. Conclusion: Federally-funded efforts contribute to safe and sustainable uptake of the Ten Steps. Note: A revised abstract including detailed results/conclusion will be submitted for consideration in the JHL publication of abstracts after the federal grant has closed in April.

    Safe and Sustainable Implementation of BFHI's Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding: EMPower Breastfeeding and the New EMPower Training Initiative

    Background: There has been a rapid increase in the number of maternity care facilities practicing the evidence-based care outlined in the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding (Ten Steps). Contributing to this increase are the state recognition programs for hospitals working on these best-practices, and the federally-funded projects helping facilities with technical assistance and training. With any rapid change effort, sustainability and safety are of utmost importance. With this in mind, the newly-funded EMPower Breastfeeding Training Initiative (EMPower BTI) focuses on safe implementation of the clinical practices contained within the Ten Steps.   Aim/Purpose: This presentation will share the results and lessons learned from the EMPower Breastfeeding Initiative (EMPower), including cohort data on Baby-Friendly designation progress, breastfeeding rates and other clinical measures on front-line practices. (EMPower closes in April of 2018). In addition, the transition to EMPower BTI will be discussed as it relates to safe implementation of evidence-based maternity care practices supporting breastfeeding. (EMPower BTI begins September 2017, with recruitment in early 2018).   Narrative: The Baby-friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) has proven effective at improving maternity care practices and increasing breastfeeding rates. Recent changes in the global BFHI guidelines have reconsidered and repackaged the Ten Steps and may signal a need for adapting ongoing efforts in the US.   Conclusion: Federally-funded efforts contribute to safe and sustainable uptake of the Ten Steps.  Note: A revised abstract including detailed results/conclusion will be submitted for consideration in the JHL publication of abstracts after the federal grant has closed in April.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2018 - Portland, Oregon, USA

    Presented by: Kathy Parry MPH, IBCLC, LMBT; Julie Bourg BSN, RN, IBCLC; Gigi Lawless  BSN, RN, IBCLC

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Report the results of the EMPower Breastfeeding Initiative.
    • Describe the new EMPower Breastfeeding Training Initiative effort.
    • Communicate the importance of safe implementation of the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding.

    Learning Level: All

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has disclosed that they have received competitive funds.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Kathy Parry

    MPH, IBCLC, LMBT

    Kathy is a social clinical research specialist at the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute (CGBI) in the Department of Maternal and Child Health at the Gillings School of Public Health at UNC-Chapel Hill. At CGBI, Kathy is Director of Prenatal Breastfeeding Education and management team member for the EMPower Initiative, a CDC-funded effort to increase the number of Baby-Friendly designated hospitals in the US. She also facilitates global projects at CGBI and is the Communications lead for the institute. Her previous work at CGBI includes the development of an adaptable Responsive Feeding curriculum for low-income countries fighting malnutrition and stunting, as well as published research on women’s perception of infant formula advertising. Kathy is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC), Licensed Massage and Bodywork Therapist (LMBT), a Certified Educator of Infant Massage and a former DONA-certified birth doula. She serves as the current Chair of the North Carolina Breastfeeding Coalition.

    Julia Bourg

    BSN, RN, IBCLC

    Julia is a social/clinical research specialist with CGBI. She is an elected member of the steering committee of the Louisiana Breastfeeding Coalition and has previously served as co-leader of the statewide clinical task force for The Gift Breastfeeding Initiative for the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals. Julia is a Registered Nurse an IBCLC. She began her nursing career in maternity services specializing in Maternal-Newborn and Neonatal Intensive Care. She and has led multiple local quality improvement projects to advance breastfeeding outcomes in her community, resulting in Terrebonne General Medical Center officially becoming one of the first hospitals in Louisiana to become Baby-Friendly in August 2014. She serves on expert panels and provides professional education and motivation related to Ten Step implementation. Julia’s efforts have been featured in the CDC’s 2014 Breastfeeding Report Card and she has been recognized by the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing.

    Gigi Lawless

    BSN, RN, IBCLC

    Gigi is a clinical research specialist at CGBI working with the EMPower Breastfeeding Initiative. Previously, she served as a Lactation Team Coordinator and Project Lead on implementation of the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding that led to Baby-Friendly Designation at New Hanover Regional Medical Center. As a Registered Nurse and IBCLC, she has committed her career to focusing on maternal-child health and removing barriers to breastfeeding in the hospital and community settings. Gigi has been involved in state and national collaboratives and quality improvement efforts to promote, protect and increase exclusive breastfeeding rates. She utilizes LEAN methodology and small test of change cycles to adopt evidence based practices. Gigi has been asked to speak on panels related to her expertise and experience in implementing the Ten Steps. She is an active member on the NC Breastfeeding Coalition and NC Lactation Consultant Association.

  • CONF 2018 WHO Guidelines on Protection, Promotion, and Support of Breastfeeding: Current Updates and Guidance for Facilities Providing Birth and Newborn Services

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/20/2018

    In 2017 the WHO and UNICEF released 2 new guidelines related to the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI). The First Document: Titled “Protection, promotion, and support of breastfeeding in facilities providing maternity and newborn services: the revised Baby-friendly Hospital Initiative 2017,” proposed Revised Operational Guidance for the BFHI. The second document, is the updated scientific evidence for the 10 Steps, which is cited as reference #34 in the first document. This second document, which is similarly titled “Protection, promotion, and support of breastfeeding in facilities providing maternity and newborn services,” went through WHO’s Scientific Guideline Development process and is not open for public comment. You can access this second document here. This workshop will review the contents of the two documents and provide an update on the direction of the BFHI for the US.

    WHO Guidelines on Protection, Promotion, and Support of Breastfeeding: Current Updates and Guidance for Facilities Providing Birth and Newborn Services

    In 2017 the WHO and UNICEF released 2 new guidelines related to the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI). The First Document: Titled “Protection, promotion, and support of breastfeeding in facilities providing maternity and newborn services: the revised Baby-friendly Hospital Initiative 2017,” proposed Revised Operational Guidance for the BFHI.  The second document, is the updated scientific evidence for the 10 Steps, which is cited as reference #34 in the first document. This second document, which is similarly titled “Protection, promotion, and support of breastfeeding in facilities providing maternity and newborn services,” went through WHO’s Scientific Guideline Development process and is not open for public comment. You can access this second document here. This workshop will review the contents of the two documents and provide an update on the direction of the BFHI for the US.

    Credit: 2 L CERP and 2 Contact Hours

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2018 - Portland, Oregon, USA

    Presented by: Trish MacEnroe BS, CDN, CLC

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Identify the purpose of World Health Organization’s two 2017 guidelines outlining: 1) the revised operational guidance for the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) and 2) the updated scientific evidence for the BFHI 10 Steps.
    • Describe the key steps affected by these WHO guidelines.
    • Describe the plans for implementation of these WHO guidelines.

    Learning Level: All

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below. 

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Trish MacEnroe

    BS, CDN, CLC

    Trish MacEnroe, BS is Executive Director of Baby-Friendly USA, Inc., Chair of the International Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative Network, former Chair of the New York State Breastfeeding Coalition, and former chair of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Association of New York State. At Baby-Friendly USA, Trish has reorganized the Baby-Friendly designation process and created tools to assist facilities pursuing designation. She has overseen the designation of approximately 320 facilities, resulting in the achievement of the United States Healthy People 2020 goals for births in Baby-Friendly designated hospitals 6 years early (8.1% in August 2014).  This percentage doubled in 2015 to 16.2%; as of December 2016, it was at 19.6%. She has also reorganized the re-designation process as well as implemented an annual quality improvement program for designated facilities. This entails ongoing monitoring of facilities to ensure maintenance of standards. There are approximately 500 hospitals participating in these processes. Trish received her Bachelor of Science degree in Food Science and Nutrition from the University of Rhode Island.

  • CONF 2018 Deconstructing Fake Equity: Lessons Learned From a Dominant Culture Institution

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/20/2018

    Background: Intersectional health inequities, racism, implicit and explicit bias, and oppression are critical issues affecting our field. Working to address these issues has often led to divisiveness and ineffective action. We recognize that individuals are in different places in their journey to understanding and addressing inequities in the field of lactation. This session will be led by an academic institution partnering with an organization that focuses on communities of color. Aims: We aim to provide a safe space for conversation around dismantling systemic oppression and fostering healing relationships in the field. Topics to be covered in this workshop will include: understanding historical trauma in the US and globally, oppressive language and actions, cultural humility and appropriateness versus cultural competence, equality versus equity, improving listening skills, what it means to be an ally, deconstructing fake equity, and trust building. Narrative: Participants will have the opportunity to voice opinions and self-reflect on their experiences in this work. The institution will share lessons learned from applying an equity lens in “First Food” work from the perspective of the dominant culture and a privileged institution. The grassroots organization will share experiences as a grassroots organization that lifts people of color and advocates for the rights of the oppressed. Conclusion: Through discourse and discussion in this workshop, we will encourage expanding ones equity lens, achieving the growth that is essential for beginning the healing process in our field. This workshop will strengthen the participants’ ability to engage with community leaders for meaningful collaboration.

    Deconstructing Fake Equity: Lessons Learned From a Dominant Culture Institution

    Background: Intersectional health inequities, racism, implicit and explicit bias, and oppression are critical issues affecting our field. Working to address these issues has often led to divisiveness and ineffective action. We recognize that individuals are in different places in their journey to understanding and addressing inequities in the field of lactation.  This session will be led by an academic institution partnering with an organization that focuses on communities of color. Aims: We aim to provide a safe space for conversation around dismantling systemic oppression and fostering healing relationships in the field. Topics to be covered in this workshop will include: understanding historical trauma in the US and globally, oppressive language and actions, cultural humility and appropriateness versus cultural competence, equality versus equity, improving listening skills, what it means to be an ally, deconstructing fake equity, and trust building. Narrative: Participants will have the opportunity to voice opinions and self-reflect on their experiences in this work. The institution will share lessons learned from applying an equity lens in “First Food” work from the perspective of the dominant culture and a privileged institution.  The grassroots organization will share experiences as a grassroots organization that lifts people of color and advocates for the rights of the oppressed.  Conclusion: Through discourse and discussion in this workshop, we will encourage expanding ones equity lens, achieving the growth that is essential for beginning the healing process in our field.  This workshop will strengthen the participants’ ability to engage with community leaders for meaningful collaboration.

    Credit: 2 L CERPs and 2 Contact Hours

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2018 - Portland, Oregon, USA

    Presented by: Catherine Sullivan MPH, RD, IBCLC; Aunchalee Loscalzo Palmquist PhD, IBCLC; Stacy Davis BA, IBCLC; Felisha Floyd BS, CLC, IBCLC

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Describe the impact of structural and institutional racism and oppression in the healthcare system.
    • Articulate the impact of lived experience on daily actions.
    • Determine their role in dismantling fake equity in the field of lactation.

    Learning Level: All

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has disclosed having received competitive funds. 

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Stacy Davis

    BA, IBCLC

    Stacy Davis is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant with a Bachelors Degree in Health Services Administration and 17 years of healthcare experience, including clinical and community-based lactation support. Her specialty is organizing and managing grassroots, community-based lactation-related programs. Stacy is tirelessly dedicated to improving the level of equity, diversity and inclusion in lactation support; she wholeheartedly believes that community-based programs provide an invaluable service as a continuity of care that bridges the gap between the healthcare provider and community, offering families the socio-cultural support to birth, nourish and nurture healthy children and communities. Currently, Davis is the Executive Director of the National Association of Professional and Peer Lactation Supporters of Color (NAPPLSC) and a lactation consultant for Ascension Health System, where she assisted two hospitals in achieving Baby-Friendly Hospital designation and mentored aspiring IBCLCs of color. Stacy owns a private practice in her hometown of Detroit, MI, and resides there with her husband, Jessie, and four sons – Lawran, Devahn, Jessie, and Jace.

    Felisha Floyd

    BS, CLC, IBCLC, RLC

    Aunchalee Palmquist

    PhD, IBCLC

    Dr. Palmquist is Assistant Professor in the Dept. of Maternal and Child Health and the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. She is a medical anthropologist and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC). Dr. Palmquist has served as an International Lactation Consultants Association (ILCA) liaison to the United Nations advocating for global breastfeeding policy, and represents CGBI in the WHO/UNICEF Global Breastfeeding Collective. Her recent research focuses on critical biocultural contexts of breastfeeding and human lactation, global maternal-child health disparities, human milk sharing and milk banking, and infant and young child feeding in emergencies. She has led workshops on cultural humility for health care professionals and has over 20 years of experience working in community-based settings, on topics ranging from indigenous, immigrant, and refugee health, marine resource management, HIV/AIDS, addiction and substance use, breast cancer, and maternal and child health.

    Catherine Sullivan

    MPH, RD, LDN, IBCLC, RLC, FAND

    Catherine Sullivan, MPH, RD, LDN, IBCLC, FAND is Director of the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute and an assistant professor in the Department of Maternal and Child Health at the Gillings School of Public Health, University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill in the United States. Catherine received her BS in Dietetics from East Carolina University and her MPH in Nutrition from UNC. She is a registered/licensed dietitian and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant with over 20 years of public health nutrition and breastfeeding experience. Catherine serves as course coordinator for the Mary Rose Tully Training Initiative, a CAAHEP/LEAARC accredited pathway 2 lactation training program, and serves on the core leadership team of the Centers for Disease Control's EMPower Breastfeeding and EMPower Training Initiatives. She is the principal investigator for ENRICH Carolinas and the RISE: Lactation Training Model (Reclaiming, Improving, and Sustaining Equity). Catherine is an Elected Director to the US Breastfeeding Committee, Co-Chair of the North Carolina Lactation Consultant Association and Past Chair of the Women’s Health Dietetic Practice Group for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Catherine is a frequent speaker at national and statewide conferences, with over 100 presentations. In 2017, she was inducted as a Fellow by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. She lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina with her husband, Fred, and her 9-year old son, Finnegan. Finn happily breastfed for the first 31 months of life.

  • CONF 2018 Gender and Queer Communities 101: Building a Foundation for Culturally Humble and Inclusive Care

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/19/2018

    This session is an introduction to LGBTQIA+ identities and communities. We will define key terms and concepts including sex, gender, intersex, gender expression, transgender, transsexual, gender identity, and intersectionality. The basic do’s and don’ts of respectful language and writing will be covered. We will also consider the question of how LGBTQIA+ communities relate to and intersect with other marginalized communities, inclusive of international contexts. Awareness of this essential background information will help lactation professionals in providing culturally competent and inclusive care for LGBTQIA+ patients and clients.

    Gender and Queer Communities 101: Building a Foundation for Culturally Humble and Inclusive Care

    This session is an introduction to LGBTQIA+ identities and communities. We will define key terms and concepts including sex, gender, intersex, gender expression, transgender, transsexual, gender identity, and intersectionality. The basic do’s and don’ts of respectful language and writing will be covered. We will also consider the question of how LGBTQIA+ communities relate to and intersect with other marginalized communities, inclusive of international contexts. Awareness of this essential background information will help lactation professionals in providing culturally competent and inclusive care for LGBTQIA+ patients and clients.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2018 - Portland, Oregon, USA

    Presented by: Trevor MacDonald

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Define key terms important to LGBTQIA+ communities.
    • Identify respectful language as well as language to avoid when discussing LGBTQIA+ issues.
    • Identify ways that other communities intersect with LGBTQIA+ identities.

    Learning Level: All

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has received support from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and Innovation. Funding #134042.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Trevor MacDonald

    Trevor MacDonald is a transgender man from Manitoba, Canada who birthed both his children at home, nursed his first child, and now nurses his second child. In 2011, he began a blog, milkjunkies.net, which is popular with both transgender individuals and healthcare providers looking for information on transgender reproduction and infant feeding. He recently led a University of Ottawa study, funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, that explored the experiences of transmasculine individuals with pregnancy, birth, and infant feeding. Trevor is the first openly transgender person to become a La Leche League Leader, and he is the author of Where's the Mother? Stories from a Transgender Dad.

  • CONF 2018 Length of Stay and Breastfeeding Status Associated with Type of Milk Supplementation Among Late Preterm Infants in a Mother/Baby Unit: Results of a Retrospective Chart Review

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/19/2018

    Background: To assess whether type of milk supplementation provided to breastfeeding late preterm infants (LPIs) is associated with length of stay (LOS) in the hospital or breastfeeding status at discharge. Methods: Retrospective chart review at a tertiary care teaching hospital in the southern United States. Participants were late preterm infants 350/7-36 6/7 weeks gestational age (N=183) admitted to the mother-baby unit between November 1, 2014 and October 31, 2016. The exposure of interest was type of milk supplementation, e.g., expressed human milk (EHM), pasteurized donor human milk (PDHM), and formula.Outcomes measured were LOS and breastfeeding status at discharge. Generalized Poisson regression models were used to compare LOS by type of milk supplementation. Modified Poisson regression models were used to estimate risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals for associations with breastfeeding status at discharge. Results: The LOS for breastfed infants supplemented with EHM and/or PDHM did not differ significantly from exclusively breastfed infants who received no supplement. Exclusively formula fed infants had a longer LOS of 3.2 days compared to 2.6 days for exclusively breastfed infants (p=0.001). Breastfed infants receiving any formula supplementation were 16% less likely to continue breastfeeding until day of discharge compared to breastfed infants receiving human milk supplementation (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.77-0.92).Conclusion: The high prevalence of supplementation among breastfeeding LPIs underscores the potential impact of type of milk supplementation on LOS and breastfeeding outcomes. Our findings suggest that human milk supplementation discourages transition to formula feeding before hospital discharge without increasing LOS.

    Length of Stay and Breastfeeding Status Associated with Type of Milk Supplementation Among Late Preterm Infants in a Mother/Baby Unit: Results of a Retrospective Chart Review

    Background: To assess whether type of milk supplementation provided to breastfeeding late preterm infants (LPIs) is associated with length of stay (LOS) in the hospital or breastfeeding status at discharge. Methods: Retrospective chart review at a tertiary care teaching hospital in the southern United States. Participants were late preterm infants 350/7-36 6/7 weeks gestational age (N=183) admitted to the mother-baby unit between November 1, 2014 and October 31, 2016. The exposure of interest was type of milk supplementation, e.g., expressed human milk (EHM), pasteurized donor human milk (PDHM), and formula.Outcomes measured were LOS and breastfeeding status at discharge. Generalized Poisson regression models were used to compare LOS by type of milk supplementation. Modified Poisson regression models were used to estimate risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals for associations with breastfeeding status at discharge.   Results: The LOS for breastfed infants supplemented with EHM and/or PDHM did not differ significantly from exclusively breastfed infants who received no supplement.  Exclusively formula fed infants had a longer LOS of 3.2 days compared to 2.6 days for exclusively breastfed infants (p=0.001).   Breastfed infants receiving any formula supplementation were 16% less likely to continue breastfeeding until day of discharge compared to breastfed infants receiving human milk supplementation (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.77-0.92).Conclusion: The high prevalence of supplementation among breastfeeding LPIs underscores the potential impact of type of milk supplementation on LOS and breastfeeding outcomes.  Our findings suggest that human milk supplementation discourages transition to formula feeding before hospital discharge without increasing LOS.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2018 - Portland, Oregon, USA

    Presented by: Rebecca Mannel BS, IBCLC, CPH; Jennifer Peck PhD

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Discuss the impact of human milk feedings on growth and development of late preterm infants.
    • Identify barriers to exclusive human milk feedings for late preterm infants on a mother/baby unit.
    • Compare impact of formula vs human milk supplementation of late preterm infants on length of stay and breastfeeding continuation.

    Learning Level: Intermediate-Advanced

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below. 

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Becky Mannel

    BS, IBCLC, FILCA

    Becky Mannel is the Director of the Oklahoma Breastfeeding Resource Center in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center and the Executive Director for the Oklahoma Mothers’ Milk Bank in the United States. She leads the Becoming Baby-Friendly in Oklahoma project sponsored by the Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH). Becky also developed and oversees the Oklahoma Breastfeeding Hotline and provides professional training/education to all Oklahoma hospitals to improve their breastfeeding care and outcomes--both OSDH-funded projects. She represents the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners on the US Breastfeeding Committee and has served twice as Lead Editor for the International Lactation Consultant Association textbook, Core Curriculum for Lactation Consultant Practice. She is past Chair of the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE) and past President of the International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA).

    Jennifer Peck

    PhD

    Dr. Peck is a Professor of Epidemiology at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (OUHSC), College of Public Health and Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, College of Medicine. She has 15 years of experience conducting clinical and population-based research in the area of reproductive, perinatal and pediatric epidemiology. In addition, Dr. Peck teaches masters and doctoral-level courses in epidemiologic methods and reproductive and perinatal epidemiology. She has also served on several National Institutes of Health and international review panels and contributed epidemiologic expertise to national committees including the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Scientific Advisory Board for the review of a perchlorate maximum contaminant level goal as it pertains to maternal and child health, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Board on the Health of Select Populations, and the IOM Committee on Gulf War and Health reviewing the reproductive health effects of Gulf War service.

  • CONF 2018 Using the Hazelbaker Assessment Tool for Lingual Frenulum Function: Guidance for Clinical Settings

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/19/2018

    Dr. Hazelbaker is responsible for developing some and formalizing and codifying all of the diagnostic criteria for tongue-tie in infants. These diagnostic criteria were then combined to form a screening tool for the condition known as the Assessment Tool for Lingual Frenulum Function©™ (ATLFF©™). Her research on assessment and screening for tongue-tie has set a worldwide standard and forms the basis for many of the other proposed and yet-to-be researched assessment processes. The ATLFF©™ remains the only valid and reliable tongue-tie screening and assessment tool for infants under 6 months of age regardless of feeding method. In this presentation, Dr. Hazelbaker uses multiple video segments to illustrate the proper use of the ATLFF©™. Participants come away with a better understanding of the ATLFF©™ and its application in clinical settings.

    Using the Hazelbaker Assessment Tool for Lingual Frenulum Function: Guidance for Clinical Settings

    Dr. Hazelbaker is responsible for developing some and formalizing and codifying all of the diagnostic criteria for tongue-tie in infants. These diagnostic criteria were then combined to form a screening tool for the condition known as the Assessment Tool for Lingual Frenulum Function©™ (ATLFF©™). Her research on assessment and screening for tongue-tie has set a worldwide standard and forms the basis for many of the other proposed and yet-to-be researched assessment processes. The ATLFF©™  remains the only valid and reliable tongue-tie screening and assessment tool for infants under 6 months of age regardless of feeding method. In this presentation, Dr. Hazelbaker uses multiple video segments to illustrate the proper use of the ATLFF©™. Participants come away with a better understanding of the ATLFF©™  and its application in clinical settings.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2018 - Portland, Oregon, USA

    Presented by: Alison Hazelbaker PhD, IBCLC, FILCA

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Describe the difference between classification tools, assessment tools and screening tools.
    • Discuss the seven function items on the ATLFF and how to properly screen using them.
    • Discuss the five appearance items on the ATLFF and how to properly screen with them.

    Learning Level: Beginner-Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below. 

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Alison Hazelbaker

    PhD, IBCLC, FILCA

    Dr. Alison Hazelbaker has been in private practice for over 30 years. She specializes in resolving infant sucking problems caused by a variety of factors including structural and psycho-emotional etiologies. She combines multiple modalities in her quest for superior breastfeeding outcomes with this group of otherwise neurotypical infants. She uses craniosacral therapy, trauma resolution and reflex activation therapies and garners a near 100% resolution rate. Dr. Hazelbaker speaks around the world about structurally-related sucking problems, their assessment and treatment. She is author of the Assessment Tool for Lingual Frenulum Function and two books on infant tongue-tie. She recently joined the team at Union Institute and University's lactation training program as an adjunct professor of clinical studies. She has five breastfed children who are now proud parents of her eight grandchildren.

  • CONF 2018 Preparing IBLCE Exam Candidates for Success: Lessons Learned From the First CAAHEP-Accredited Pathway 2 Program

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/19/2018

    The Mary Rose Tully Training Initiative (MRT-TI) of the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute (CGBI) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the first CAAHEP-accredited Pathway 2 lactation training program. Since its inception in August 2009, MRT-TI has graduated an annual cohort of candidates prepared to sit for the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners board certification exam. We conducted an alumni survey of MRT-TI graduates to assess how prepared they were to pass this exam and enter the workforce by collecting data on their professional progress since completing the program. We disseminated an electronic survey via social media and CGBI and MRT-TI listservs to reach all alumni who have graduated from the yearlong training program. Anonymous zip codes were also collected from survey respondents to map the distribution of alumni across North Carolina. These maps can be used to identify geographic variations in the concentration of both practicing and non-practicing IBCLCs across the state and their relationship to clinical site and maternity center locations. The results from this survey will characterize the career trajectories of MRT-TI alumni and the role of the training program in supporting their professional development. Additionally, lessons learned from our survey can be used to support new Pathway 2 programs in their development to replicate and enhance this model program.

    Preparing IBLCE Exam Candidates for Success: Lessons Learned From the First CAAHEP-Accredited Pathway 2 Program

    The Mary Rose Tully Training Initiative (MRT-TI) of the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute (CGBI) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the first CAAHEP-accredited Pathway 2 lactation training program. Since its inception in August 2009, MRT-TI has graduated an annual cohort of candidates prepared to sit for the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners board certification exam. We conducted an alumni survey of MRT-TI graduates to assess how prepared they were to pass this exam and enter the workforce by collecting data on their professional progress since completing the program. We disseminated an electronic survey via social media and CGBI and MRT-TI listservs to reach all alumni who have graduated from the yearlong training program. Anonymous zip codes were also collected from survey respondents to map the distribution of alumni across North Carolina. These maps can be used to identify geographic variations in the concentration of both practicing and non-practicing IBCLCs across the state and their relationship to clinical site and maternity center locations. The results from this survey will characterize the career trajectories of MRT-TI alumni and the role of the training program in supporting their professional development. Additionally, lessons learned from our survey can be used to support new Pathway 2 programs in their development to replicate and enhance this model program.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2018 - Portland, Oregon, USA

    Presented by: Kathryn Wouk MS, IBCLC; Catherine Sullivan MPH, RD, IBCLC

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    • Characterize the workforce trajectories of Pathway 2-trained alumni.
    • Integrate lessons learned from MRT-TI alumni to support future Pathway 2 programs in their development.

    Learning Level: Intermediate-Advanced

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below. 

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Catherine Sullivan

    MPH, RD, LDN, IBCLC, RLC, FAND

    Catherine Sullivan, MPH, RD, LDN, IBCLC, FAND is Director of the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute and an assistant professor in the Department of Maternal and Child Health at the Gillings School of Public Health, University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill in the United States. Catherine received her BS in Dietetics from East Carolina University and her MPH in Nutrition from UNC. She is a registered/licensed dietitian and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant with over 20 years of public health nutrition and breastfeeding experience. Catherine serves as course coordinator for the Mary Rose Tully Training Initiative, a CAAHEP/LEAARC accredited pathway 2 lactation training program, and serves on the core leadership team of the Centers for Disease Control's EMPower Breastfeeding and EMPower Training Initiatives. She is the principal investigator for ENRICH Carolinas and the RISE: Lactation Training Model (Reclaiming, Improving, and Sustaining Equity). Catherine is an Elected Director to the US Breastfeeding Committee, Co-Chair of the North Carolina Lactation Consultant Association and Past Chair of the Women’s Health Dietetic Practice Group for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Catherine is a frequent speaker at national and statewide conferences, with over 100 presentations. In 2017, she was inducted as a Fellow by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. She lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina with her husband, Fred, and her 9-year old son, Finnegan. Finn happily breastfed for the first 31 months of life.

    Kathryn Wouk

    MS, IBCLC

    Kathryn Wouk is a PhD candidate in the Maternal and Child Health Department of the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  She is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant and works as a Graduate Research Assistant with the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute. Under the mentorship of Dr. Alison Stuebe, she studies breastfeeding and maternal mental health and is particularly interested in women’s emotional experience of infant feeding. She currently serves on the board of the North Carolina Breastfeeding Coalition and the Global Health Foundation.

  • CONF 2018 Lactation Support in Disasters and Emergencies: Integrating Life Course, Psychosocial, and Human Rights Perspectives

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/19/2018

    In emergencies, women and children are among the most vulnerable to multiple forms of violence and exploitation as well as illness and death. Displacement resulting from natural disasters and complex humanitarian crises has a profound impact on health during the perinatal period, with significant consequences that reverberate across the life course. The literature reveals that emergencies disproportionately affect women’s and girls’ access to medical, social, cultural, and familial support systems. Barriers to perinatal and psychosocial care are associated with increased rates of morbidity and mortality among mothers/birthing parents and infants. Poorly coordinated and inappropriate emergency response (e.g., mass formula distribution), exacerbate the negative impact of emergencies on maternal-child perinatal health. In this presentation, the significance of skilled lactation support in emergencies will be discussed in the context of the reproductive health continuum. Special emphasis will be placed on the integration of psychosocial and lactation support in complex humanitarian settings.

    Lactation Support in Disasters and Emergencies: Integrating Life Course, Psychosocial, and Human Rights Perspectives

    In emergencies, women and children are among the most vulnerable to multiple forms of violence and exploitation as well as illness and death. Displacement resulting from natural disasters and complex humanitarian crises has a profound impact on health during the perinatal period, with significant consequences that reverberate across the life course. The literature reveals that emergencies disproportionately affect women’s and girls’ access to medical, social, cultural, and familial support systems. Barriers to perinatal and psychosocial care are associated with increased rates of morbidity and mortality among mothers/birthing parents and infants. Poorly coordinated and inappropriate emergency response (e.g., mass formula distribution), exacerbate the negative impact of emergencies on maternal-child perinatal health. In this presentation, the significance of skilled lactation support in emergencies will be discussed in the context of the reproductive health continuum. Special emphasis will be placed on the integration of psychosocial and lactation support in complex humanitarian settings.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Conference July, 2018 - Portland, Oregon, USA

    Presented by: Aunchalee Loscalzo Palmquist PhD, IBCLC

    • Describe various factors that shape global perinatal health disparities within the natal dyad.
    • Describe emergency response practices that (i) reproduce health inequalities and (ii) support resilience to health inequalities.
    • Use examples to illustrate the importance of integrated psychosocial and lactation support in reducing short- and long-term negative health consequences across the life course.

    Learning Level: All

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has disclosed having received competitive funds. 

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (ILCA-P0286). Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    CDR: The CDR accepts hours without prior CDR approval and recognizes approval by the ANCC. When recording hours on the CDR Activity Log, indicate the provider as "ILCA (ANCC)."

    Aunchalee Palmquist

    PhD, IBCLC

    Dr. Palmquist is Assistant Professor in the Dept. of Maternal and Child Health and the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. She is a medical anthropologist and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC). Dr. Palmquist has served as an International Lactation Consultants Association (ILCA) liaison to the United Nations advocating for global breastfeeding policy, and represents CGBI in the WHO/UNICEF Global Breastfeeding Collective. Her recent research focuses on critical biocultural contexts of breastfeeding and human lactation, global maternal-child health disparities, human milk sharing and milk banking, and infant and young child feeding in emergencies. She has led workshops on cultural humility for health care professionals and has over 20 years of experience working in community-based settings, on topics ranging from indigenous, immigrant, and refugee health, marine resource management, HIV/AIDS, addiction and substance use, breast cancer, and maternal and child health.