Welcome ILCA Members! Here are learning modules that come free with your membership:

ILCA Member Library

  • WEBINAR - Physical Therapy Techniques in Lactation

    Includes Credits

    Breast and nipple pain, engorgement, and recurrent plugs leading to mastitis are common reasons why mothers stop breastfeeding earlier than recommended. Despite their prevalence, these remain challenging conditions to treat. In the past, patients with deep, chronic breast pain in breastfeeding were often treated for yeast infections, though no scientific evidence exists to support this diagnosis. More current literature has established subacute mastitis, persistent hyperlactation (“oversupply”), and dermatitis as causes of breast pain. Once these conditions have been treated or ruled out, patients nevertheless may experience persistent pain, plugging, and/or engorgement. Recent reports describe the efficacy of pharmacologic interventions, such as antihistamines and beta blockers, in functional breast pain. Before starting medication, breast physical therapy interventions can be utilized. In addition to treatment of pain, these techniques can employed for relief of engorgement, plugging, and inflammation.

  • WEBINAR - Baby Led Weaning and the Role of the IBCLC

    Includes Credits

    Baby Led Weaning as an approach to introducing solids has been growing in popularity over the past 15 years. However, despite the growing demand from parents, there remains a lack of guidance from health care professionals. Additionally, there are some misconceptions around baby led weaning including safety. This presentation looks to provide further understanding of what baby led weaning is and how the lactation professional can provide guidance to parents.

  • WEBINAR - Breastfeeding Strategies Used by Women with Physical Disabilities

    Includes Credits

    Women with physical disabilities have a desire to breastfeed. However, women with physical disabilities also experience unique barriers that may interfere with their feeding goals. Improved support from healthcare professionals, including lactation consultants is necessary to overcome these challenges. This presentation will outline how healthcare professionals can incorporate the breastfeeding techniques identified in our study when caring for and supporting women with physical disabilities who wish to breastfeed.

  • WEBINAR - Care of the Same Sex Family

    Includes Credits

    Disparities exist in the health care system in regards to the quantity and quality of care received by LGBTQ individuals and same sex families as compared to heterosexual individuals and families. Nurses and health care providers require increased knowledge about this population and strategies to effectively communicate and care for individuals and families in this community. Many nurses and health care providers lack knowledge about the LGBTQ population and same sex families; they have not been educated in strategies to deliver culturally appropriate care.

  • CONF 2019 The Role of Lactation Consultants in the Code

    Includes Credits

    In this session, Laurence Grummer-Strawn, MPA, MA, PhD​ presents on how the promotion of breast-milk substitutes, particularly through the health care system, is a significant barrier to optimal infant and young child feeding. The International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes lays out responsibilities for health workers and health systems in protecting breastfeeding. The 2016 WHA resolution 69.9 extended these responsibilities further, focusing on avoiding conflicts of interest in relationships with manufacturers and distributers of breast-milk substitutes. As health professionals focusing on breastfeeding, lactation consultants have a special role to play in advocating for the Code and educating their health care partners on their responsibilities under the Code. Lactation consultants are in a unique position to identify Code violations through their interactions with mothers and in observing health care institutions. WHO and UNICEF have developed a toolkit on Code monitoring that can assist countries in working with lactation consultants in enforcing national laws on the marketing of breast-milk substitutes.

  • CONF 2019 Breastfeeding Without Nursing: Reducing the Prejudice Against Exclusive Pumping

    Includes Credits

    In this session, Fiona Jardine, MA (Cantab.), LLM, MLS, ALC​ presents on how exclusive pumping (EPing) can—and successfully does—provide the solution to many breastfeeding problems while still providing the benefits of feeding human milk. However, research on EPing is scant and often limited to secondary analysis of existing data, content analysis of expressed milk, or pumping in the context of the neonatal intensive care unit. Despite the increasing rates of EPing, little is known about the reasons for EPing initiation and cessation, the support needs and information behaviors of exclusive pumpers (EPers), or EPers’ lived experiences. My research collected data from current and past EPers through a one-time initial survey and longitudinally through a series of follow-up surveys. While the surveys covered a wide range of topics, this workshop focuses on the reactions respondents experienced when others found out they were EPing, as well as the information and support they received from a variety of different sources. While many reported positive reactions to and support of EPing, an alarming number reported the opposite, especially from healthcare and lactation care providers. Together with poor advice, this lack of appropriate support of EPing often contributes to EPers feeling frustrated and unsupported, threatening both the initiation and duration of their breastfeeding journey. This workshop will examine the reasons EPers initiate and cease EPing in the context of these undesirable experiences and what caregivers/parents, healthcare and lactation care providers, educators, policy makers, researchers, and activists can do to improve the lived experiences of EPers.

  • CONF 2019 Tongue or the Breast? Teasing Out the Etiology of Breastfeeding Problems

    Includes Credits

    In this session, Catherine Watson Genna, BS, IBCLC presents on how breastfeeding difficulties can be rooted in maternal and/or infant pathology or management. This presentation reviews maternal conditions and suboptimal early breastfeeding management associated with low milk production and infant structural issues that interfere with breastfeeding initiation.

  • CONF 2019 Integrating Lactation Support into Early Intervention Services for Infants with Special Needs

    Includes Credits

    In this session, Jada Wright Nichols, MS, OTR/L, IBCLC presents on early childhood intervention as a support and educational system for very young children (aged birth to three in America, or to six, in some other countries) who have been victims of, or who are at high risk or have developmental delays or disabilities. Some states and regions have chosen to focus these services on children with developmental disabilities or delays, but Early Childhood Intervention is not limited to children with these disabilities. The mission of early childhood intervention is to assure that families who have at-risk children in this age range receive resources and supports that assist them in maximizing their child's physical, cognitive, and social/emotional development while respecting the diversity of families and communities. Typically, the services are state/ regionally funded, and include physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, nutrition, social work, and, psychological, and education services. These interdisciplinary services are produced in the child’s natural environment, and the service providers may be from the public or private sector. Weaving lactation evaluation and consultation services into what’s already being provided is an ideal way to help normalize breastfeeding, and increase access to breastfeeding support to some of the most vulnerable families, thereby improving breastfeeding rates and helping to decrease comorbidities and other threats to public health. Strategies for incorporating lactation support, as well as for working with other allied health professionals will be addressed.

  • WEBINAR - Disparities in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and the Role of the Speech-Language Pathologist in Lactation

    Includes Credits

    This presentation will describe the history of infant feeding in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and how culture is changing. We will learn how speech-language pathologist (SLP) have been pioneering safe and efficient swallow practices in the NICU while needing the support and knowledge of lactation consultants to help guide milk production and breastfeeding/chestfeeding. We will explore current breastfeeding/chestfeeding disparities and how this gap may be closed with the teamwork of lactation consultants and SLPs.

  • JHL 35(2) Affirming Language Use When Providing Care for and Writing About Childbearing Families Who Identify as LGBTQI+

    Includes Credits

    After completing this study module, the learner will be able to: 1. Explain the importance of affirming language use when providing health care for and writing about childbearing families who identify as LGBTQI+. 2. List three issues to consider when providing health care to childbearing families who identify as LGBTQI+. 3. Describe appropriate language use in interpersonal communications with how to choose fitting language for each LGBTQI+ family member.