• Lactation Clinical Instruction Curriculum Part 4 of 5

    2 credits offered

    Clinical Instruction Course 4: Teaching and Providing Feedback explores models for clinical education that are tailored to varying degrees of proficiency and experience. Teaching methods and providing feedback to interns are also addressed. Credit: 2 L CERPs and 2 Contact Hours

  • Lactation Clinical Instruction Curriculum Part 5 of 5

    2 credits offered

    Clinical Instruction Course 5: Public Speaking and Presentation Skills focuses on skills in public speaking and professional presentations that are critical for clinical instructors. Course activities provide practice in requesting, receiving, and offering feedback on presentation skills. Credit: 2 L CERPs and 2 Contact Hours

  • CONF 2016 Growth Charts: Use and Misuse

    1 credit offered

    In this session, Dr. Gonzalez reviews the correct way to use growth charts to determine growth in nurslings. Through several case studies, he illustrates normal growth and development, how normal growth and development vary significantly, and how the misuse of growth charts can lead to babies being labeled as having problems when they are not at all having problems. Dr. Gonzalez is both knowledgeable about the subject matter and entertaining in its presentation. Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

  • CONF 2016 Lactation Education for Healthcare Providers: Evolving Curriculum to Improve Breastfeeding Support

    1 credit offered

    All members of the healthcare team must be knowledgeable about lactation management in order to provide optimal support to dyads and increase breastfeeding rates. The speaker examines the important role that healthcare providers play in promoting and supporting lactation and presents the findings of her dissertation on current inconsistencies in lactation education in graduate healthcare programs. She then describes the development of a free, evidence-based, computer-delivered lactation education program designed to improve breastfeeding knowledge, attitudes, and practices of healthcare providers. Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

  • CONF 2016 Skin to Skin Care Decreases Procedural Pain for Newborns

    1 credit offered

    In this compelling session, the speakers identify the negative consequences of newborn exposure to numerous painful procedures after delivery and discuss how parent-provided skin-to-skin care can decrease procedural pain in newborns no matter how they are fed. They present the results of the pilot study they conducted at a Baby Friendly designated hospital in the United States. The session describes how they used a PICO question (Problem or Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcomes) to encourage their facility to question its current practices, examine the evidence, and change to engaging in evidence-based practice to reduce newborn pain. The PICO question was “For newborns born at more than 37 weeks gestation, does the use of skin-to-skin care reduce procedural pain?” The study showed a significant reduction of procedural pain in newborns receiving skin-to-skin care. Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

  • CONF 2016 The Affective Needs of Children: Crying and the Need for Comforting

    1 credit offered

    In this humorous but evidence-based session, Dr. Carlos González, offers a delightful, basic review of why human infants need to be near their mothers/caregivers, and why carrying and keeping infants near, even during sleep, is a developmentally appropriate response to the innate proximity-seeking behaviors exhibited by all infants. He explains from a biological and anthropological perspective why infant separation is not normal for human survival. In the words of the speaker, “Children all over the world, just like the offspring of many other species, want to be with their mothers all day (and night) long, want to be carried, and cry when separated from their mothers. But, many people in our western industrialized culture see that as abnormal. Our children are not our enemies. They want to be with us, because they love us. A lot.” Credit: 1 R CERP and 1 Contact Hour

  • CONF 2016 WHO and the Baby Friendly Initiative

    1 credit offered

    This presentation gives an overview of the current global status of the Baby Friendly Initiative and discusses the importance of optimal maternity care practices on breastfeeding success. Key challenges faced by countries to obtain and maintain Baby Friendly status are identified along with strategies for overcoming these challenges and achieving sustainable healthcare practices through interdisciplinary support networks. Also outlined are the formal WHO processes that is underway to systematically review the evidence and re-evaluate the 10 steps, as well as a call to action to ILCA members. Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

  • CONF 2016 Addressing BFHI Step 10 for Underserved Population: Reducing Breastfeeding Disparities through Peer and Professional Support

    1 credit offered

    This session provides an overview of how equitable access to peer and professional support—via full implementation of Step 10 of the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative—can reduce inequities in lactation initiation and continuation rates in underserved communities. Topics addressed include the importance of using a public health framework for understanding and responding to lactation challenges that stem from a family’s social context, structural barriers that contribute to inequitable access to lactation support and to breastfeeding, barriers and facilitators to implementing community breastfeeding programs, and examples of strategies and programs. While the speakers discuss data, programs, and experiences in the United States, the concepts, frameworks, and strategies presented are relevant in global settings. The question and answer session at the end gives more information on global application of the presentation content. Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

  • CONF 2016 Cooperative Infant Feeding in Humans: Biocultural Perspectives of Sharing Human Milk

    1 credit offered

    Dr. Palmquist reviews the origins of breastfeeding and human milk sharing through her unique perspective as an anthropologist. This session reviews information about alloparenting and allomaternal breastfeeding across many cultural contexts, as well as research into cultural norms and taboos. It helps learners understand the origins of human milk sharing and societal views of the practice today and deepens our understanding of the importance of human milk for all human infants. Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

  • CONF 2016 Developing a Clinical Lactation Training Program: A Model for Academic Medical Centers

    1 credit offered

    Obtaining the necessary lactation training to fulfill the eligibility requirements of the IBLCE certification examination can be difficult. For aspiring IBCLCs, completion of a Pathway 3 program may be their only option to meet the requirements. However, finding mentors to directly supervise their training can be a major obstacle. The speakers of this informative session present their experiences implementing a Pathway 3 clinical lactation training program in a university health system in the United States. They discuss the planning process in developing a 6-month, full-time, clinical training program designed to meet the 500-hour clinical experience requirement. Their model may be used as a guideline by lactation departments at other medical centers to develop their own clinical lactation training program. Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour