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  • WEBINAR - Sustainable Motherhood: The Impact of the use of Artificial Infant Milk on the Environment

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Sustainable Maternity: Traditionally, Breastfeeding consultants have had abundant scientific evidence about the risks of not breastfeeding. Both risks for the baby and the mother, in the short and long term. As important as these are, we seem not to be able to attract a society that feeds on breast milk substitutes and believes that this causes no harm. The main objective of my presentation is to give the lactation consultant another area of evidence related to the current and vital issue of caring for the environment. During my presentation we will walk through the different areas of concern, beginning with the effects on land, erosion, deforestation, lowered productivity and biodiversity. Additionally, we will explore the huge water footprint in the manufacture of dry milk and water pollution. We will then touch on antibiotic use in cattle and the secondary effects on humans. More environmental impact topics will include air pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, packaging, use of plastics, transportation, as well as the waste derived from the extra menstrual periods and lack of birth control. Breast milk is a valuable renewable natural resource, and is the most ecological existing food source. It is produced and delivered to the consumer in the same place, without using other resources, does not cause contamination and helps to ensure the nutrition of the weakest and poorest, when food security has become a concern.

    Sustainable Motherhood: The Impact of the use of Artificial Infant Milk on the Environment

    Sustainable Maternity: Traditionally, Breastfeeding consultants have had abundant scientific evidence about the risks of not breastfeeding. Both risks for the baby and the mother, in the short and long term. As important as these are, we seem not to be able to attract a society that feeds on breast milk substitutes and believes that this causes no harm. The main objective of my presentation is to give the lactation consultant another area of evidence related to the current and vital issue of caring for the environment. During my presentation we will walk through the different areas of concern, beginning with the effects on land, erosion, deforestation, lowered productivity and biodiversity. Additionally, we will explore the huge water footprint in the manufacture of dry milk and water pollution. We will then touch on antibiotic use in cattle and the secondary effects on humans. More environmental impact topics will include air pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, packaging, use of plastics, transportation, as well as the waste derived from the extra menstrual periods and lack of birth control. Breast milk is a valuable renewable natural resource, and is the most ecological existing food source. It is produced and delivered to the consumer in the same place, without using other resources, does not cause contamination and helps to ensure the nutrition of the weakest and poorest, when food security has become a concern.

    Credit: 1.00 L CERP and 1.00 Contact Hours

    Source: ILCA Webinar 20 May 2021

    Presented by: Martha Alicia Ferraez de Lee MSP, IBCL

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to: 

    1) State the relationship that exists between not breastfeeding, the making of artificial infant milk and the impact on the environment

    2)  Identify 3 of the main effects that the making of breastmilk substitutes have on the environment

    3) Distinguish changes in personal lifestyle to protect the environment but also in the way to teach mothers and families to help them measure the risks of not breastfeeding on the baby, the mother, the family, and the environment

    Learning Level: Intermediate

    Expiration Date: 19 July 2024

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. Approval Number ILCA-P0286. Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    ILCA education is provided as a service to our members for continuing education, knowledge, and awareness. We believe in fostering an inclusive environment that supports diversity and removes barriers. The views and opinions expressed in this education, including the choice of vocabulary, expressions, and use of supporting evidence-based research belong to the presenter. ILCA is steadfast in our commitment to present, learn, and discuss any information in a safe, respectful, and supportive environment.

  • WEBINAR - Effect of Precise Assessment for Frenotomy in Ankyloglossia Infants Less Than 6-months Old on Breastfeeding Success Rate and Efficacy

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Research by (Messner AH et.al,2000) showed that there are controversies in management of ankyloglossia infants among physicians. Most of lactation consultants believe that early frenectomy helps to improve breastfeeding efficacy and ensure breastfeeding success even though minority of physician's respondents believe tongue tie associated with feeding problems. The objective of this study was to show the importance of precise assessment for early frenectomy in infants less than 6 months old to improve breastfeeding success rate and this also prevents unnecessary frenectomy for whom are not indicated. This research recommends that early frenectomy significantly improve breastfeeding success rate but should not be routinely done for all ankyloglossia infants especially for whom are not having breastfeeding difficulties. A precise assessment of tongue tie and breastfeeding is very important to be performed prior to the procedure in order to prevent unnecessary frenectomy.

    Effect of Precise Assessment for Frenotomy in Ankyloglossia Infants Less Than 6-months Old on Breastfeeding Success Rate and Efficacy

    Research by (Messner AH et.al,2000) showed that there are controversies in management of ankyloglossia infants among physicians. Most of lactation consultants believe that early frenectomy helps to improve breastfeeding efficacy and ensure breastfeeding success even though minority of physician's respondents believe tongue tie associated with feeding problems. The objective of this study was to show the importance of precise assessment for early frenectomy in infants less than 6 months old to improve breastfeeding success rate and this also prevents unnecessary frenectomy for whom are not indicated. This research recommends that early frenectomy significantly improve breastfeeding success rate but should not be routinely done for all ankyloglossia infants especially for whom are not having breastfeeding difficulties. A precise assessment of tongue tie and breastfeeding is very important to be performed prior to the procedure in order to prevent unnecessary frenectomy.

    Credit: 1.00 L CERP and 1.00 Contact Hours

    Source: ILCA Webinar 22 March 2021

    Presented by: Hairin Anisa, MD

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    1. Describe tongue tie and the impact on breastfeeding

    2. Discuss proper assessment prior to frenotomy procedure, to prevent maltreatment (over or under treatment)

    3. Explain the procedure of early frenotomy and its prevention of failure to breastfeed

    Learning Level: Intermediate

    Expiration Date: 20 May 2023

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. Approval Number ILCA-P0286. Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    ILCA education is provided as a service to our members for continuing education, knowledge, and awareness. We believe in fostering an inclusive environment that supports diversity and removes barriers. The views and opinions expressed in this education, including the choice of vocabulary, expressions, and use of supporting evidence-based research belong to the presenter. ILCA is steadfast in our commitment to present, learn, and discuss any information in a safe, respectful, and supportive environment.

    Hairin Anisa

    Pusat Rawatan Pakar Kanak-kanak Adda & Monash University Malaysia

    Dr. Anisa is working as a Consultant Pediatrician and IBCLC in her ambulatory care center. Her passion in breastfeeding for the past 20 years of service drove this enthusiasm to present for ILCA about her experience in treating tongue tie to ensure successful breastfeeding in communities. There is improvement in technical skills of frenotomy that can be done in outpatient clinic with very minimal risk of bleeding. Apart from clinical service, Dr. Anisa is a founder of a networking program, Breastfeeding Counselors Networking Program (BCNP). This program provides home visits for Malaysian mothers. As fractional Pediatric lecturer in Monash University Malaysia, she has taught medical students the basic knowledge in breastfeeding and pediatric nutrition since 2014. Dr. Anisa has also published 2 books about Induced lactation guideline (in 2017) and A comic Dr Super Pot Pet (January 2020) about breastfeeding basics in creative ways.

  • WEBINAR - Challenges of Health Care Providers: Father's Role in Breastfeeding

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Breastfeeding mothers require a lot of support in initiating and maintaining breastfeeding. Many researchers have confirmed that breastfeeding practices have physiological, psychosocial, economic and environmental advantages for children. This study is expected to benefit the health provider to support, promote, and protect breastfeeding with regards to challenges they experience while caring for their client. Literature indicates positive associations of breastfeeding practices with child health. Those babies who receive exclusive breastfeeding and optimum feeding are less likely suffer from various health problems. This study will also utilize qualitative method as an inquiry. The focus group provided an avenue to health care providers to share their awareness with regards to breastfeeding, their perspectives on the father's role and the challenges that they are facing in promoting, protecting and supporting breastfeeding.

    Challenges of Health Care Providers: Father's Role in Breastfeeding

    Breastfeeding mothers require a lot of support in initiating and maintaining breastfeeding. Many researchers have confirmed that breastfeeding practices have physiological, psychosocial, economic and environmental advantages for children. This study is expected to benefit the health provider to support, promote, and protect breastfeeding with regards to challenges they experience while caring for their client. Literature indicates positive associations of breastfeeding practices with child health. Those babies who receive exclusive breastfeeding and optimum feeding are less likely suffer from various health problems. This study will also utilize qualitative method as an inquiry. The focus group provided an avenue to health care providers to share their awareness with regards to breastfeeding, their perspectives on the father's role and the challenges that they are facing in promoting, protecting and supporting breastfeeding.

    Credit: .50 L CERP and .50 Contact Hours

    Source: ILCA Webinar 15 March 2021

    Presented by: Yasmin Murad Mithani, RN, IBCLC

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    1. Describe challenges of father's role in breastfeeding.

    2. Explore strategies for supporting mothers for breastfeeding.

    3. Develop strategies to protect breastfeeding practices.

    Learning Level: Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. Approval Number ILCA-P0286. Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    ILCA education is provided as a service to our members for continuing education, knowledge, and awareness. We believe in fostering an inclusive environment that supports diversity and removes barriers. The views and opinions expressed in this education, including the choice of vocabulary, expressions, and use of supporting evidence-based research belong to the presenter. ILCA is steadfast in our commitment to present, learn, and discuss any information in a safe, respectful, and supportive environment.

    Yasmin Murad Mithani, RN, IBCLC

    The Woman's Hospital of Texas

    Yasmin Murad Mithani works as a Registered Nurse and IBCLC at The Woman's Hospital of Texas in Houston, Texas, United States. She has competed her MSc in International Primary Care and co-authored and published an article, Emerging Role of Clinical Preceptors (CPs) at a Private University, Karachi, Pakistan in the Journal of Education and Training Studies in 2017.

  • DOCUMENTARY: We're Mammals

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Breastfeeding challenges are prevalent particularly in the early stages after birth. According to a study published in Pediatrics 2013, 92% of women studied in the United States experienced breastfeeding challenges, including problems with latching, breastfeeding pain and milk quantity concerns. Breastfeeding is a physiological function of all mammals and once the basics are understood, supporting mothers and babies in the early stages becomes much easier. This documentary will explore how competent infants are at locating the breast and latching. Infants are hardwired to breastfeed, just like other mammals, and have inborn feeding behaviors that are easy to observe. This documentary is the lactation consultant's experience comparing her clients in Vancouver, Canada with rural areas of Iran. This education can help to demonstrate a new possibility for health care providers by offering simple and effective breastfeeding support.

    DOCUMENTARY: We're Mammals

    Breastfeeding challenges are prevalent particularly in the early stages after birth. According to a study published in Pediatrics 2013, 92% of women studied in the United States experienced breastfeeding challenges, including problems with latching, breastfeeding pain and milk quantity concerns. Breastfeeding is a physiological function of all mammals and once the basics are understood, supporting mothers and babies in the early stages becomes much easier. This documentary will explore how competent infants are at locating the breast and latching. Infants are hardwired to breastfeed, just like other mammals, and have inborn feeding behaviors that are easy to observe. This documentary is the lactation consultant's experience comparing her clients in Vancouver, Canada with rural areas of Iran. This education can help to demonstrate a new possibility for health care providers by offering simple and effective breastfeeding support.

    Credit: 1.50 L CERP and 1.50 Contact Hour(s)

    Source: Shared with permission by Shahrzad Tayebi, IBCLC 

    Presented by: Shahrzad Tayebi, IBCLC

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    1. Define the necessary elements of newborns' feeding behavior and the ability to self-latch

    2. Describe the importance of the newborns' body freedom which is necessary to achieve a good latch

    3. List 3 ways to support a mother and baby through exploring the "mammalian" approach to breastfeeding

    4. Strategize 2 ways that they can play a flexible, non-interventionist and facilitative role in this process, in their own practice setting

    Learning Level: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. Approval Number ILCA-P0286. Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    ILCA education is provided as a service to our members for continuing education, knowledge, and awareness. We believe in fostering an inclusive environment that supports diversity and removes barriers. The views and opinions expressed in this webinar, including the choice of vocabulary and expressions, belong to the webinar presenter.  ILCA is steadfast in our commitment to present, learn, and discuss any information in a safe, respectful, and supportive environment - we believe that we are better together.

    Expiration Date: 21 January 2024

  • WEBINAR - Protecting Mother-infant Contact and Breastfeeding During the COVID-19 Pandemic

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The COVID-19 pandemic has presented an enormous global challenge with significant implications for maternal, neonatal and child health. Lactation professionals face numerous barriers to supporting breastfeeding and the use of human milk due to rapidly evolving scientific knowledge, public health and governmental measures attempting to control the epidemic, and additional threats to health systems that struggle to limit infection and supply protections to health care workers. This presentation brings together knowledge from public health and the social sciences to provide key insights and resources for protecting mother-infant contact and breastfeeding during the pandemic.

    Protecting Mother-infant Contact and Breastfeeding During the COVID-19 Pandemic

    The COVID-19 pandemic has presented an enormous global challenge with significant implications for maternal, neonatal and child health. Lactation professionals face numerous barriers to supporting breastfeeding and the use of human milk due to rapidly evolving scientific knowledge, public health and governmental measures attempting to control the epidemic, and additional threats to health systems that struggle to limit infection and supply protections to health care workers. This presentation brings together knowledge from public health and the social sciences to provide key insights and resources for protecting mother-infant contact and breastfeeding during the pandemic.

    Credit: 1.50 L CERP and 1.50 Contact Hours

    Source: ILCA Webinar 23 November 2020

    Presented by: Cecilia Tomori, PhD, MA 

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    1. Describe core tenets of WHO guidance on COVID-19 in relation to lactation

    2. Discuss the harmful effects of guidance that does not follow WHO for breastfeeding

    3. Identify underlying cultural assumptions that are reflected in diversity of COVID-19 guidance in different settings

    4. Translate this knowledge into action in advising policy makers and supporting lactating families in your practice

    Learning Level: Intermediate, Advanced

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. Approval Number ILCA-P0286. Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    ILCA education is provided as a service to our members for continuing education, knowledge, and awareness. We believe in fostering an inclusive environment that supports diversity and removes barriers. The views and opinions expressed in this education, including the choice of vocabulary, expressions, and use of supporting evidence-based research belong to the presenter. ILCA is steadfast in our commitment to present, learn, and discuss any information in a safe, respectful, and supportive environment.

    Cecilia Tomori, PhD, MA

    Director of Global Public Health and Community Health, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing

    Cecília Tomori, PhD, MA is a Hungarian-American anthropologist and public health scholar who currently serves as Director of Global Public Health and Community Health at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. Dr. Tomori’s research combines anthropological and public health approaches to investigate and address the structural and sociocultural drivers that shape health inequities in maternal and child health as well as sexual and reproductive health. This work centers on deep engagement with the lived experiences of local and global communities who face numerous health challenges due to stigmatization and discrimination. Dr. Tomori has a demonstrated track record of successful collaborations with colleagues at Johns Hopkins and beyond on breastfeeding, infant sleep, and HIV prevention. She has authored two books that explore social and biocultural aspects of breastfeeding, Breastfeeding: New Anthropological Approaches (with AEL Palmquist & EA Quinn, Routledge 2018) and Nighttime Breastfeeding: An American Cultural Dilemma (Berghahn 2014),  and numerous publications on a range of public health issues in journals including Social Science and MedicineAIDS and BehaviorArchives of Sexual Behavior, and BMC Public Health.

  • WEBINAR - Physical Therapy Techniques in Lactation

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Breast and nipple pain, engorgement, and recurrent plugs leading to mastitis are common reasons why mothers stop breastfeeding earlier than recommended. Despite their prevalence, these remain challenging conditions to treat. In the past, patients with deep, chronic breast pain in breastfeeding were often treated for yeast infections, though no scientific evidence exists to support this diagnosis. More current literature has established subacute mastitis, persistent hyperlactation (“oversupply”), and dermatitis as causes of breast pain. Once these conditions have been treated or ruled out, patients nevertheless may experience persistent pain, plugging, and/or engorgement. Recent reports describe the efficacy of pharmacologic interventions, such as antihistamines and beta blockers, in functional breast pain. Before starting medication, breast physical therapy interventions can be utilized. In addition to treatment of pain, these techniques can employed for relief of engorgement, plugging, and inflammation.

    Physical Therapy Techniques in Lactation

    Breast and nipple pain, engorgement, and recurrent plugs leading to mastitis are common reasons why mothers stop breastfeeding earlier than recommended.  Despite the prevalence, these remain challenging conditions to treat. In the past, patients with deep, chronic breast pain in breastfeeding were often treated for yeast infections, though no scientific evidence exists to support this diagnosis.  More current literature has established subacute mastitis, persistent hyperlactation (“oversupply”), and dermatitis as causes of breast pain. Once these conditions have been treated or ruled out, patients nevertheless may experience persistent pain, plugging, and/or engorgement. 

    Recent reports describe the efficacy of pharmacologic interventions, such as antihistamines and beta blockers, in functional breast pain.  Before starting medication, breast physical therapy interventions can be utilized. In addition to treatment of pain, these techniques can employed for relief of engorgement, plugging, and inflammation.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Webinar 12 June 2020

    Presented by: Katrina B. Mitchell, MD, IBCLC
     

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    1. Describe the lack of evidence to support candida as an agent of nipple and breast pain

    2. Demonstrate technique of lymphatic massage and dangers of deep tissue massage in the lactating breast

    3. Distinguish benefits of therapeutic ultrasound in plugging and mastitis


    Learning Level: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. Approval Number ILCA-P0286. Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    ILCA webinars are provided as a service to our members for continuing education, knowledge, and awareness. We believe in fostering an inclusive environment that supports diversity and removes barriers. The views and opinions expressed in this webinar, including the choice of vocabulary and expressions, belong to the webinar presenter.  ILCA is steadfast in our commitment to present, learn, and discuss any information in a safe, respectful, and supportive environment - we believe that we are better together.

    Katrina Mitchell, MD, IBCLC

    Katrina B. Mitchell, MD is a board-certified general surgeon, fellowship-trained breast surgical oncologist, and international board certified lactation consultant (IBCLC) whose practice includes the care and surgery of women with breast cancer and benign breast disease.  She also treats maternal complications of lactation, and has a special interest in pregnancy and postpartum breast cancer.  She resides in Santa Barbara, California and practices at the Ridley Tree Cancer Center at Sansum Clinic.  She enjoys reading, traveling, and spending time with her son at the beach.  More information about her clinical and educational interests is available at katrinamitchell.org.

  • WEBINAR - Baby Led Weaning and the Role of the IBCLC

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Baby Led Weaning as an approach to introducing solids has been growing in popularity over the past 15 years. However, despite the growing demand from parents, there remains a lack of guidance from health care professionals. Additionally, there are some misconceptions around baby led weaning including safety. This presentation looks to provide further understanding of what baby led weaning is and how the lactation professional can provide guidance to parents.

    Baby Led Weaning and the Role of the IBCLC

    Baby Led Weaning as an approach to introducing solids has been growing in popularity over the past 15 years. However, despite the growing demand from parents, there remains a lack of guidance from health care professionals. Additionally, there are some misconceptions around baby led weaning including safety. This presentation looks to provide further understanding of what baby led weaning is and how the lactation professional can provide guidance to parent

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Webinar 1 April 2020

    Presented by: Meghan McMillan, RD, CSP, IBCLC
     

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    1. Define Baby Led Weaning

    2. Identify the reasons parents choose Baby Led Weaning approach

    3. List the safety concerns of Baby Led Weaning

    4. Describe the implementation of Baby Led Weaning


    Learning Level: Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. Approval Number ILCA-P0286. Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    ILCA webinars are provided as a service to our members for continuing education, knowledge, and awareness. We believe in fostering an inclusive environment that supports diversity and removes barriers. The views and opinions expressed in this webinar, including the choice of vocabulary and expressions, belong to the webinar presenter.  ILCA is steadfast in our commitment to present, learn, and discuss any information in a safe, respectful, and supportive environment - we believe that we are better together.

    Meghan McMillan

    Meghan McMillin holds a Master’s Degree in Human Nutrition from the University of Illinois at Chicago. She is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) and Board Certified Specialist in Pediatric Nutrition (CSP). Further, Meghan obtained the credential of International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC). 

    Located in the United States, Meghan is the owner of Mama & Sweet Pea Nutrition, a private practice and consulting company that focuses on prenatal, postpartum and infant care. The introduction of solids, food allergies, and baby led weaning are among her specialties.

    Meghan is a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and presented on Baby Led Weaning at their Food & Nutrition Conference in 2018. She is also a member of the Northern Illinois Lactation Consultant Association and sits on the board for Breastfeed Chicago, a local non-profit. In addition, Meghan is a freelance writer and co-authored the eBook Avoiding Allergens While Breastfeeding.

  • WEBINAR - Breastfeeding Strategies Used by Women with Physical Disabilities

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Women with physical disabilities have a desire to breastfeed. However, women with physical disabilities also experience unique barriers that may interfere with their feeding goals. Improved support from healthcare professionals, including lactation consultants is necessary to overcome these challenges. This presentation will outline how healthcare professionals can incorporate the breastfeeding techniques identified in our study when caring for and supporting women with physical disabilities who wish to breastfeed.

    Breastfeeding Strategies Used by Women with Physical Disabilities

    Women with physical disabilities have a desire to breastfeed. However, women with physical disabilities also experience unique barriers that may interfere with their feeding goals. Improved support from healthcare professionals, including lactation consultants is necessary to overcome these challenges. This presentation will outline how healthcare professionals can incorporate the breastfeeding techniques identified in our study when caring for and supporting women with physical disabilities who wish to breastfeed.

    Credit: 1 L CERP and 1 Contact Hour

    Source: ILCA Webinar 13 February 2020

    Presented by: Tiahna Warkentin, University of Toronto, MD Candidate 2020

    Upon completion, the learner will be able to:

    1.  Outline effective breastfeeding/chestfeeding strategies used by lactating parents with physical disabilities.
    2.  Describe the challenges parents with physical disabilities experience when breastfeeding/chestfeeding.

    Learning Level: Intermediate

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare. The presenter has no significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any product(s) or provider(s) of any services relating to the subject matter of this presentation unless otherwise stated below.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. Approval Number ILCA-P0286. Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

    ILCA webinars are provided as a service to our members for continuing education, knowledge, and awareness. We believe in fostering an inclusive environment that supports diversity and removes barriers. The views and opinions expressed in this webinar, including the choice of vocabulary and expressions, belong to the webinar presenter.  ILCA is steadfast in our commitment to present, learn, and discuss any information in a safe, respectful, and supportive environment - we believe that we are better together.

    Tiahna Warkentin

    MD Candidate 2020

    Tiahna is a final year medical student at the University of Toronto. She has a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology with a focus in Exercise, Disability, and Aging studies. She has spent the past four years working with Dr. Berndl at Sunnybrook Health Sciences centre exploring Breastfeeding Strategies Used by Women with Physical Disability. She is passionate about working with individuals with physical disabilities to identify and address barriers that impact function. 

  • JHL 36(1) Factors Associated with Breastfeeding Among Women with Gestational Diabetes

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    After completing this study module, the learner will be able to: 1. List one factor related to women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) not initiating or not maintaining breastfeeding 2. Explain two benefits of breastfeeding for women with GDM 3. Describe an intervention that can lead to early initiation and longer duration of breastfeeding, especially in women with GDM

    Independent Study Module for International Board Certified Lactation Consultants®

    Title: Factors Associated with Breastfeeding Among Women with Gestational Diabetes

    Author(s): Shaline Modena Reinheimer, MSc, Maria Ines Schmidt, MD, PhD, Bruce Bartholow Duncan, MD, PhD, Michele Drehmer, PhD

    Source: Journal of Human Lactation 36(1) 2020

    After completing this study module, the learner will be able to:

    1. List one factor related to women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) not initiating or not maintaining breastfeeding

    2. Explain two benefits of breastfeeding for women with GDM

    3. Describe an intervention that can lead to early initiation and longer duration of breastfeeding, especially in women with GDM

    1 L-CERP and contact hour(s)

    You will have two attempts to achieve a passing score of 70% on this module.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare.

    The author(s) declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. Approval Number ILCA-P0286. Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.

  • JHL 35(4) Does Truthful Advertising Ever Pass "The Smell Test" in a Peer-Reviewed Journal?

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    After completing this study module, the learner will be able to: 1. Describe how health care professionals are subjected to marketing and persuasion techniques (including advertisements in journals) designed to influence clinical care. 2. Identify strategies to counteract persuasive marketing tactics/techniques and reduce their inappropriate influence on clinical care. 3. Describe Principle 5 of the IBLCE Code of Professional Conduct (CPC) for IBCLCs' relationship to marketing pressures.

    Independent Study Module for International Board Certified Lactation Consultants®

    Title: Does Truthful Advertising Ever Pass "The Smell Test" in a Peer-Reviewed Journal?

    Author(s): Elizabeth C. Brooks, JD, IBCLC, FILCA

    Source: Journal of Human Lactation 35(4) 2019

    After completing this study module, the learner will be able to:

    1. Describe how health care professionals are subjected to marketing and persuasion techniques (including advertisements in journals) designed to influence clinical care.

    2. Identify strategies to counteract persuasive marketing tactics/techniques and reduce their inappropriate influence on clinical care.

    3. Describe Principle 5 of the IBLCE Code of Professional Conduct (CPC) for IBCLCs' relationship to marketing pressures.

    You will have two attempts to achieve a passing score of 70% on this module.

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    Disclosures: ILCA accepts no commercial support for continuing education activities. The activity planners have no conflicts of interest to declare.

    The author(s) declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.

    CERPs: ILCA is an approved provider of Continuing Education Recognition Points (CERPs) with the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE). (CLT-108-7).

    ANCC: ILCA is accredited as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. Approval Number ILCA-P0286. Accepted for BRN credit by the Board of Registered Nursing.